The Laws Known As Jim Crow Law Article On Pbs Essay

The Laws Known As Jim Crow Law Article On Pbs Essay

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The laws known as “Jim Crow” were laws presented to basically establish racial apartheid in the United States. These laws were more than in effect for “for three centuries of a century beginning in the 1800s” according to a Jim Crow Law article on PBS. Many try to say these laws didn’t have that big of an effect on African American lives but in affected almost everything in their daily life from segregation of things: such as schools, parks, restrooms, libraries, bus seatings, and also restaurants. The government got away with this because of the legal theory “separate but equal” but none of the blacks establishments were to the same standards of the whites. Signs that read “Whites Only” and “Colored” were seen at places all arounds cities. In addition to being segregated in various aspects of life they were being denied the right to vote in the South. They were making literacy test mandatory at voting booths which wasn’t fair because many of the blacks were former slaves so they did not know to read or write. A famous trial that supported the idea of “separate but equal” was the Pl...

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