Language Forces Us On The World As Man Presents It Us Essay

Language Forces Us On The World As Man Presents It Us Essay

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“Language forces us to perceive the world as man presents it to us.” (Julia Penelope). Language is a mold Many will say that no matter what language one speaks everyone has the same brain anatomy thus language does not shape the way that we think and they way we perceive the world. While others believe there is no correlation with language and how it shapes human thoughts, there is evidence that proves otherwise; language does shape the way that we think. It is odd to think that no matter the language one speaks that everyone’s way of thinking is all identical. Lera Boroditsky article, “Lost in Translation” goes over her theory about language and how it shapes the way that we think. She shuts down a lot of critics who do not agree with her theory and gives examples as to why it is true. Boroditsky in her article, says that different languages offer new perspectives on the world (469-473). “You Say Up, I say Yesterday” by Joan O’C. Hamilton is also about how language shapes thought, she talks about Boroditsky and her language and thought theory and gives her own examples as to why she thinks it is true. (463-468). Some critics believe that there is no correlation or relationship with different languages and how thoughts are shaped however, language shapes thoughts in many ways, those being, how people see different scenarios, the different meanings in
Language causes there to be a barrier between people who speak different languages, for instance, people who speak different languages analyze events differently thus, causing minds to be shaped in various ways. It essentially causes people to perceive the world contrastively. Boroditsky article says, “ languages also shape how we understand causality. For example, English likes to...


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...thinking or perception is similarly sparse.” (Hamilton 464). Leila Gleitman may be right however, she is just starting her own opinion without actually backing it up with evidence to prove her claim.





I agree with Lera Boroditsky’s theory that language shapes the way that we think. I believe that the world being filled with many languages serves as a tool that adds diversity to the human brain and mind. It would be completely absurd to believe that no matter what language one speaks that all of our minds and thoughts are shaped the same way. Along with it being a crazy thought that language does not shape the way we think, it would also be boring to have everyone have the same thoughts and perceptions of the world. Without language shaping thoughts there would not be people from all over the world coming up with the innovations and inventions that we have today.

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