Language Development Is A Mental Instrument That Supports More Matured Thinking

Language Development Is A Mental Instrument That Supports More Matured Thinking

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language is a mental instrument that supports more matured thinking and that language development occurs alongside cognitive development. For instance, there are children who are not able to communicate their emotions because of the poor language skills (who might have English as a second language), or because their family culture and traditions don 't allow them to express opinions. These children will demonstrate behaviours such as hitting, biting, kicking or angry outburst, as a way to express their emotions. But, under the others influence, they will have the chance to observe the others and be motivated to learn how to self-regulate. As Florez (2011) says: "Children learn to regulate thoughts, feelings, behaviours and emotion by watching and responding to adults’ self-regulation."
Evidences show that children who have difficulty regulating their emotions, paying attention, initiating peer interactions and sustaining engagement in learning tasks are at risk for school difficulties” (Bulotsky-Shearer, Dominguez & Bell, 2012, p. 421) Children find it difficult to self-regulate because they still are in the process of developing these skills. Self-regulation can be very effortful part of a child’s emotional development and that requires support and positive guidance from the adults. It is the ability that a child to monitor and control its own behaviour, emotions, or thoughts, altering them in accordance with the demands of the situation. It also includes the abilities to impede first responses, to resist interventions from inappropriate stimulation, and to persist on relevant tasks even when the tasks are not enjoyable. (Cook & Cook, 2009) Among the theories of learning, sociocultural perspective provides a unique understanding...


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...to appropriately respond to their environment. Teaching children about self-awareness and how to control their emotions play a key role not only in their emotional development but also in their social development. Social development is linked to other aspects of development: early sensory and cognitive development being especially closely connected. (Doherty, J., & Hughes, M., 2009). Research has found that young children who engage in intentional self-regulation learn more and go further in their education (Blair & Diamond 2008). Offering children with the appropriate support since the young age nurtures their development and learning. If not supported enough, and children are not able to demonstrate self-regulation since a young age, difficulties may arise when a child is at school, where the learning environment is more structured and advanced (Scott & Palincsar,

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