Language And The Language Barrier Essay

Language And The Language Barrier Essay

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In a perfect world, all people speak to each other freely with no language barrier. However, that perfect world does not exist. Fortunately, thousands of individuals are trained to become capable of bridging the language barrier. These people, known as translators and interpreters, spend decades mastering languages and transcribing in between their first and second languages. While interpreters speak their chosen languages, translators writes and records. Translating “books, papers, reports, [and] recordings…” is a translator’s main purpose is to translate written and recorded materials (ACT, 2013, para. 1).
Before one can consider becoming a translator, there are several needed skills: fluency in more than one language, reliability, the ability to remain neutral, and an understanding of deadlines and confidentiality (National Career Service, 2012). Most employers require translators to complete at least a Bachelor’s program in their language (ACT, 2013). However, Lucy Cantwo (2015) states a Master’s degree program or Doctorate is more acceptable, along with several years of experience in chosen languages. While involved in a degree program, Julie Johnson suggests students read, write, and watch television in the chosen language (n.d.). Furthermore, she advises “improving public speaking skills, learn how to take care of yourself, [and] be prepared for a lifelong learning” (para. 6, 9, 10). As of 2010, the field of translation had nearly fifty thousand members, but this field is expected to grow at least 2.2% a year (ACT). Professional translators earn an average of $47,500 per year, which is around $22.75 an hour (ACT). Additionally, translators can choose work in an office or be contracted from home (Cantwo). In the field, ther...


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...lini). Clients only care about the translation, its accuracy, and how much it costs, not the translator. Therefore, as long as one is reachable, it does not matter if a translator works in a stereotypical office, at home, or even at an internet café. In this field, the positive aspects out way the negative, leading most students to continue their education.
After constant research, I still believe translation is the career path I wish to pursue. Once hearing fellow students’ inspirations and the advice from my interviewee, Lucy Cantwo, I am more excited about my career choice than ever. Despite the qualities that are used to weed out the reliable translators from the bad, I am excited to experience the better qualities like job availability and a flexible work schedule. Therefore, my research has provided better insight on translation that I previous believed I had.

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Language And The Language Barrier Essay

- In a perfect world, all people speak to each other freely with no language barrier. However, that perfect world does not exist. Fortunately, thousands of individuals are trained to become capable of bridging the language barrier. These people, known as translators and interpreters, spend decades mastering languages and transcribing in between their first and second languages. While interpreters speak their chosen languages, translators writes and records. Translating “books, papers, reports, [and] recordings…” is a translator’s main purpose is to translate written and recorded materials (ACT, 2013, para....   [tags: Translation, Language, Academic degree]

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