The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan Essay

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan Essay

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In The Joy Luck Club, culture plays a crucial part in the conflict between mother and daughter. Tan takes advantage of her past family experiences to inspire her fictional novel based on maintaining Chinese heritage, along with the pertinent task of discovering ones true identity. Tan uses the mothers’ collections of stories and multiple points of views to display how the Chinese emigrant daughters’ immerse themselves in American culture while their mothers wish for them to maintain their Chinese heritage.
The Joy Luck Club is a novel comprised of the stories of four Chinese-immigrant mothers and their American-born daughters. “Each of the four Chinese women has her own view of the world based on her experiences in China and wants to share that vision with her daughter. The daughters try to understand and appreciate their mothers' pasts, adapt to the American way of life, and win their mothers' acceptance” (“Joy,” Novels). Due to the fact that the daughters were born in America, many things that would be simple for most mother daughter relationships, was a vigorous task. “…the tensions between mothers and daughters and between U.S. and Chinese influences are constantly expressed in bicultural ways. The mothers are firmly rooted in their Chinese cultural heritage and are comfortable with being Chinese. The daughters are awkward with their own Chinese features, the Chinese language, and their repressed Chinese spirituality. The mothers identify with their ethnicity, but the daughters are ambivalent about who they are” (Soitos). The mothers want the best of both worlds for their daughters, as most mothers would. However, it is not as simple a task in the world they were living in. “The American-born daughters have their own choices...


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...s Times: Profiles of 300 Notable Literary Works and the Historical Events that Influenced Them. Joyce Moss and George Wilson. Vol. 5: Civil Rights Movements to Future Times (1960-2000). Detroit: Gale, 1997. 229-235. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 4 Feb. 2014.
"Joy Luck Club (The)" Novels for Students. Ed. Diane Telgen. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale, 1997. 203-221. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 4 Feb. 2014.
Priya, Lakshmi. "Cultural barrier through communication--as explained in Amy Tan's the Joy Luck Club." Language In India Jan. 2012: 70+. Literature Resource Center. Web. 10 Feb. 2014.
Soitos, Stephen. "Tan, Amy 1952–." American Writers: A Collection of Literary Biographies, Supplement 10. Ed. Jay Parini. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2002. 289-300. Scribner Writers on GVRL. Web. 13 Feb. 2014.
Tan, Amy. The Joy Luck Club. New York: Putnam’s, 1989. Print.


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