Essay on John Stuart Mill 's Theory Of Morality

Essay on John Stuart Mill 's Theory Of Morality

Length: 1319 words (3.8 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Throughout the history of humanity, morals have been incorporated into everyday life. The first set of morals came from religion, which told people what to do and not do to go to heaven. To centuries, the morals established by the church had never been questioned. To analyze the kind of morals, present in humanities every day, philosophers identified the different types of ethical moral. Two of this philosopher 's theories would be defined to find the similarities and differences that impact humanity. One of this philosophers is Utilitarian John Stuart Mill, author of Utilitarianism that focuses on utility. The other philosopher is metaphysician Immanuel Kant, author of Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals focusing on the theory of Categorical Imperative. Mill and Kant define how morals are view and identified.
English philosopher John Stuart Mill argues about this theory of morality known as Utilitarianism. Mill believes that Utilitarianism is the basics of morality. Utilitarianism is about the greatest happiness principle that states that people do what is right to maximize happiness and minimize sorrow. Mill believes that happiness is the sole purpose of everyday life. If people do not act for the sake of happiness, people will be miserable and unhappy. This theory values the idea of pleasure or utility, and avoidance of pain Mill explains this by stating that people 's desire particular means that justifies their happiness or for happiness overall. However, the utility is not solely based on personal pleasure but, for each member of society. An individual does what is right for the general public not because it is the right thing to do, but because it bring overall happiness. Also, this concludes that people’s rights ca...


... middle of paper ...


...asure of isolated locations, it is all about the happiness of the majority. The solution will not only maximize happiness but also minimize the pain of a group whose pain was at its maximum. That would be how Kant 's Categorical Imperative and mill’s Utilitarianism would impact the authors view point on segregation.
In the theory of morality, authors Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill have an interesting viewpoint on what the right thigh to do is. Kant’s theory is morality cannot be taught that but comes when an individual is rational and is based on duty. Mill’s theory is based on what will make others happy and would decrease suffering. Both theories are still incorporate in life since people do what will make others happy while doing what is morally right. These authors have identified different types of morals that are present whenever someone makes a decision.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

John Stuart Mill 's Ethical Theory Essay

- On the other hand, when determining the morality of the act of giving money, John Stuart Mill’s utilitarian ethical theory would focus on consequences as well as two main components: deriving highest pleasure and avoiding pain for the majority (Mill 8). Mill argues, “He who saves a fellow creature from drowning does what is morally right, whether his motive be duty or the hope of being paid for his trouble” (Mill 18). Through this example, John Stuart Mill describes the importance of consequences, rather than motive in determining whether an act is ethical....   [tags: Ethics, Utilitarianism, Morality, Immanuel Kant]

Strong Essays
1609 words (4.6 pages)

John Stuart Mill Moral Theory Of Utilitarianism Essay

- For years many philosophers have tries to create a perfect working system of what they think morality is. In all the claims of what morality is none could agree. So each wrote their own ideas on what morality entail thus presenting the augments to the public in the judging of why and which theory was the best. However, Scheffler in his, Morality’s demand and their Limits, evaluate all the concepts that the ideal moral theory must have. This essay will discuss the ideas that Scheffler presents in relation to John Stuart Mill moral theory of Utilitarianism....   [tags: Ethics, Morality, Utilitarianism, Moral]

Strong Essays
1674 words (4.8 pages)

John Stuart Mill 's Theory Of Classical Utilitarianism Essay

- In this essay, I examine John Stuart Mill’s theory of classical Utilitarianism and define the three key features the Utilitarian doctrine consists of. Then, raise objections to Mill’s responses to possible counter-arguments against his theory to present and explain how ineffective the Utilitarian moral system is. The guiding principle that Utilitarianism adheres to is great happiness, therefore, an action is morally permissible if and only it produces at least as much net happiness as any other available action....   [tags: Utilitarianism, Morality, Human, Ethics]

Strong Essays
959 words (2.7 pages)

Utilitarianism By John Stuart Mill Essay

- Utilitarianism Many people agree on the fact that society needs to act with a sense of morality. However, there are differing opinions on how to go about this. One popular idea is that a person should always consider the greater good of society in order to be moral. This moral principle is known as utilitarianism. The end result of this theory is happiness for all, which appeals to many people, since happiness is typically a goal everyone can agree to strive towards. The following examines the approach of utilitarianism from the perspective of John Stuart Mils, as well as looks its strengths and weakness’s through a thought argument, to demonstrate how this is played out in society....   [tags: Utilitarianism, Morality, John Stuart Mill]

Strong Essays
1005 words (2.9 pages)

The Ethical Theory Of Utilitarianism Essay

- Zohra Javid Professor Taylor PHIL 2320 31 October 2015 Second Reaction Paper o Consider the ethical theory of utilitarianism as discussed in chapters 7 and 8 of The Elements of Moral Philosophy. A. Explain the difference between act (classical) and rule versions of utilitarianism. What are the advantages and disadvantages of each. B. Explain the drawbacks to consequentialist ethical theories. What potential factors do consequentialists exclude from ethical debates. And, what examples did John Stuart Mill provide in Utilitarianism to support his principle of utility in ethics....   [tags: Ethics, Utilitarianism, Morality, John Stuart Mill]

Strong Essays
926 words (2.6 pages)

Essay about The Utilitarianism Of John Stuart Mill

- Many have different views when it comes to defining morality and the ways in which a person can achieve morality. The three different views that we have discussed in class are the utilitarianism of John Stuart Mill, the non-consequentialism of Immanuel Kant, and the virtue-based ethics of Aristotle. The view on morality that i disagree with most is Mill’s utilitarianism for various reasons. I believe that the other two views have their flaws, but Mill’s view is by far the most flawed, in my opinion....   [tags: Utilitarianism, Ethics, John Stuart Mill]

Strong Essays
852 words (2.4 pages)

Essay about Utilitarianism By John Stuart Mill

- Along with other noted philosophers, John Stuart Mill developed the nineteenth century philosophy known as Utilitarianism - the contention that man should judge everything in life based upon its ability to promote the greatest individual happiness. While Bentham is acknowledged as the philosophy’s founder, it was Mill who justified the axiom through reason. He maintained that because human beings are endowed with the ability for conscious thought, they are not merely satisfied with physical pleasures; humans strive to achieve pleasures of the mind as well....   [tags: Utilitarianism, John Stuart Mill, Pleasure]

Strong Essays
978 words (2.8 pages)

John Stuart Mill 's Theory Of Utilitarianism Essay

- John Stuart Mill’s theory of Utilitarianism is a moral consequentialist view that maintains actions are good if they lead to happiness and bad if they lead to suffering. The same rationale can be applied to obstruction—whatever prevents suffering is morally good, and whatever prevents happiness is morally bad. It should be noted Mill characterizes happiness as “pleasure and the absence of pain” (104). He also puts forth that intellectual pleasures—such as the satisfaction that comes with finishing a paper, or having a successful long-term friendship—are better than the animalistic pleasures taken in eating or sex....   [tags: Utilitarianism, John Stuart Mill, Suffering]

Strong Essays
862 words (2.5 pages)

John Stuart Mill And The Utilitarian Principle Essay

- John Stuart Mill believes in the utilitarian principle that no action in of itself is good or bad, but the consequences of the action. People who believe in the utilitarian principle agrees that the way to judge an action’s morality is by seeing if it promotes the greatness amount of happiness, or pleasure, to the greatest amount of people. Based on that belief, Mill thinks that the only possible standard to judge ethics is happiness. Every action that we take, whether it be for short-term pleasure (lower-order pleasures) or if it’s for long term pleasure (higher-order pleasures), the tail end result for doing anything in this lifetime is to be truly happy....   [tags: Utilitarianism, Ethics, Morality, John Stuart Mill]

Strong Essays
806 words (2.3 pages)

John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Happiness Essay

- John Stuart Mill's Philosophy of Happiness Along with other noted philosophers, John Stuart Mill developed the nineteenth century philosophy known as Utilitarianism - the contention that man should judge everything in life based upon its ability to promote the greatest individual happiness. While Bentham, in particular, is acknowledged as the philosophy’s founder, it was Mill who justified the axiom through reason. He maintained that because human beings are endowed with the ability for conscious thought, they are not merely satisfied with physical pleasures; humans strive to achieve pleasures of the mind as well....   [tags: John Stuart Mill Philosophical Essays]

Strong Essays
1114 words (3.2 pages)