John F. Kennedy 's Speech Essay

John F. Kennedy 's Speech Essay

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After narrowly winning the popular vote over former vice President and Republican Candidate Richard Nixon by only two tenths, John Fitzgerald Kennedy was elected as the 35th President of the United States of America. President John F. Kennedy delivered his Inaugural Address in the cold on January 20, 1961 with roughly 8 inches of snow on the ground. Before the inauguration could take place, Army flamethrowers had to clear the snow from Pennsylvania Avenue so fellow Americans could make their way to the swearing in. The newly sworn in President began his address by letting his fellow Americans know that he was willing to work with everyone, to make not only the United States, but each country a greater place for everyone to live rather than cause issues between the countries. In his speech, Kennedy pledged “the loyalty of faithful friends” and said that when everyone was “united there is little we cannot do in a host of cooperative ventures.” The President not only wanted to help his country, he also wanted to help those “in the huts and villages of half the globe struggling to break the bonds of mass misery.” Kennedy’s plan came at the best time, as many Americans were against another battle between the countries as “nuclear weapons could literally devastate the United States and the world as well.” In his inaugural address, President John F. Kennedy used rhetorical devices including logos, ethos and pathos to show America that he was best for the job, as well as bring much needed hope to the people of the United States as well as the country.
In his address, President Kennedy told his fellow Americans why a peaceful world was needed. Kennedy used logos to try and persuade many Americans that the United States wanted to help us an...


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... America on a personal level by saying, “us.” Also in his speech, Kennedy uses ethos/credibility appeal when he makes it clear he is willing to work with others and fear will never persuade him. Lastly, I believe that the closing of the address had the most impact, “And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country”, and “My fellow citizens of the world, ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man." These lines are very powerful, as well as emotional since it relates to the audience and all of those across the nation, makes those witnessing the speech and those across America want to do something good for their country, and makes the audience agree that everyone across the world should be more worried about a new era of peace instead of worrying about war and power.

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