Jewish Population During The Nazi Regime Essay

Jewish Population During The Nazi Regime Essay

Length: 1320 words (3.8 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

From 1933 to 1938, the Jewish population in Germany experienced many changes in their everyday lives under the Nazi regime. Jewish perceptions during this time were divided into two distinct groups that shared some overarching similarities. Hitler’s sudden rise to power also led many Jews to underestimate the nature of the threat they were facing. Overall, German Jews had limited options when facing the Nazis, representing the overwhelming threat they faced.
Jews perceived themselves in different ways during this time period. In a broader sense, German Jews began to organize themselves into two groups within different ideologies. These included the Zionists and the German Jews. Those who considered themselves Zionists argued that the Jewish people should establish themselves back in their original homeland, Palestine. They also argued that the Jewish people were their own race. “Wear the Yellow Badge with Pride!” an editorial written in response to hatred Jews were facing by Robert Weltsch and published by the Zionist Federation of Germany, examined how some Zionists may have perceived themselves during this period, “This editorial called for pride in Jewishness, rejection of assimilation, and support of Zionism; its impact – especially on German Jewish youth – was electrifying (Dawidowicz, 143).” Throughout his piece, Weltsch calls on fellow Jews to be proud and more vocal about their heritage in communities across Germany, “Today Jews can speak only as Jews; anything else would be senseless (Dawidowicz, 147).” Weltsch addresses the boycott of Jewish businesses encouraging Jews to experience an awakening. He says there can be a Jewish rebirth, “if the Jews are not as they are depicted by their adversaries (Dawidowicz, 147).” T...


... middle of paper ...


....
The escalation of the nature of the threat the Jews were facing also limited the amount of responses they had when facing the new regime. As the hatred and persecution the Jews faced continued to become more intense, the option to resist became less realistic as they faced death.
Overall, Jewish perceptions of themselves and of the threat they were facing resulted in various responses to the rise of the Nazi regime. Initially, both groups of German Jews, the Zionists and those who remained loyal to Germany, had different views of themselves as Jews in the community. However, they each desired to cling to their traditions when faced with hatred. This outward pride diminished as the German Jewish community began to face more hostile persecution from the Nazis. As this threat escalated, German Jews had two viable options, to emigrate or to wait it out in Germany.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The War Of The Nazi Regime Essay

- 5,933,900 Jew 's were estimated to have been killed in the Holocaust. In total, about 67% of the Jewish population was sought out and killed during the Nazi regime leaving only 33%, about 2,970,000 Jews survived. To put that into perspective: 2 out of 3 Jews were killed during the Holocaust. In order to survive the inhumane, sadistic, immoral environment under the tight grip of the Deutsches Reich, otherwise known as das Dritte Reich, the Jewish people were forced to make dehumanizing choices on a regular basis....   [tags: Jews, The Holocaust, Nazi Germany]

Better Essays
1272 words (3.6 pages)

Bureaucracy During The Nazi Regime Essay

- During the Holocaust, bureaucracy played a large role within the Nazi Regime. Bureaucracy is a form of government that works through a chain of command hierarchy deriving from a high officials decision. The Nazi Regime had a structure for the specific purpose to remedy inefficiencies and exterminate Jews. The importance in Nazi Germany’s bureaucratic structure remained the basis for everything; everything went through the system. The Nazi’s bureaucratic structure was important in developing efficient methods of execution through loyal and strategic gatherings such as the Wannsee Conference, through the Nazi chains of command and extensive detail....   [tags: Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler, The Holocaust, Nazism]

Better Essays
1737 words (5 pages)

Essay on The Holocaust And The Nazi Regime

- The Holocaust was the systematic persecution and murder of approximately six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators between 1933 and 1945. The Nazis, who came to power in Germany in January 1933, believed that Germans were "racially superior" and that the Jews, deemed "inferior," were an alien threat to the so-called German racial community. Gypsies, people with mental and physical disabilities, and Poles were also targeted for destruction or decimation for racial, ethnic, or national reasons....   [tags: Nazi Germany, Nazism, Adolf Hitler, Germany]

Better Essays
1425 words (4.1 pages)

The Time Of The Nazi Regime Essay

- History Unfolded Throughout the years, it has been assumed that the events that were occurring in Germany during the time of the Nazi regime were not being reported here in the United States. It was assumed that Americans had no knowledge of the atrocities that were occurring in Germany after Hitler came to power. However, in recent times, research has been conducted that has proven that this information is false. It has been shown that Americans knew, to some extent, what was occurring to the Jews in Germany....   [tags: Nazi Germany, Nazism, Germany, Adolf Hitler]

Better Essays
971 words (2.8 pages)

Essay about Adolf Hitler And The Nazi Regime

- During World War II in Europe, many non-Jewish individuals became anti-Semitic and obedient to Adolf Hitler’s tyrannical rule. Their public and private perspectives seemed to merge as many citizens under the rule of the Third Reich displayed extreme social conformity and obedience, following religiously the cult-like beliefs of the Nazi regime (Koonz, 2003). During his rise to power, Adolf Hitler employed a number of very deliberate techniques of social influence designed to sway public opinion, beliefs, and behaviors....   [tags: Nazi Germany, Nazism, Adolf Hitler, Sociology]

Better Essays
1486 words (4.2 pages)

Essay on Hitler And The Nazi Regime

- The "Final Solution" was the Nazi operation to murder every single Jew that they could find and that they get their hands on, including everything Jewish that they could find and destroy. Historians to this day are not sure of an exact date when Hitler and the Nazi regime decided to embark on the Final Solution. In fact, for years, for decades, historians were divided into two schools of thought, that called themselves the Intentionalists and the Functionalists. The Intentionalists argue that it was always the intention of Hitler and the Nazi regime to murder the Jews, and it was built into the Nazi regime, based on Nazi ideology....   [tags: Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler, World War II, Jews]

Better Essays
1502 words (4.3 pages)

The Jewish Partisans of The Holocaust Essay

- Resistance during the Holocaust, both Jewish and non-Jewish, is a daunting task to cover. Information abounds in relation to this which leads to the problem of putting all of it into one paper. Due to this, I will only cover the specifically Jewish Partisan fighters. The movements are divided into two groups of Eastern and Western Fighters. Partisans fought in almost every European country including but not limited to Belgium, Poland, Russia, France, Italy, Greece, and Lithuania. “A partisan is a member of an organized body of fighters who attack or harass an enemy, especially within occupied territory; a guerrilla.” The Jewish partisans were mostly teenagers, both male and female, of whic...   [tags: Nazi, Jewish]

Better Essays
1148 words (3.3 pages)

White Rose Against The Nazi Regime Essay

- One can never imagine what it was like to live in a country that is under an absolute dictatorship. For a long time there has never been such absolute control. For instance, in Nazi Germany the government was in control of everything: the news media, arms, police, the armed forces, communications, travel, all levels of education, and all cultural and religious institutions. People that lived through this period in Germany were terrified. They could not speak openly against the Nazis, even with their own family, never knowing whether they might go out and report them....   [tags: Nazi Germany, Adolf Hitler, Nazism, World War II]

Better Essays
872 words (2.5 pages)

The Nazi Regime Essay

- The Nazi Regime In this essay I will be analyzing the statement; The most important reason why there was little opposition towards the Nazi regime was because of its use of propaganda. In order to do this I will explain how the Nazis actions and the events leading up to the war prevented opposition. During the pre ww2 era and particularly in the 1930s Hitler focused a lot of his attention on the propaganda surrounding himself and the policies of his Nazi party. A massive propaganda campaign was launched which aimed to convince the German people that all the Nazis did was right and good....   [tags: Papers]

Better Essays
1749 words (5 pages)

Essay about The Nazi Regime

- The Nazi Regime Adolf Hitler became the Chancellor of Germany on January 30, 1933, and during this time, he implemented a series of measures designed to eliminate Jews from German life with the help of the desperation of a German people who blamed the Jews for every evil of the Weimar era: capitalism, communism, internal conflict, and the Treaty of Versailles. The Jews were supposedly the root cause of Germany's problems, both as greedy internal infiltrators who did not belong to the blood and soil of Germany, and as an international conspiracy limiting Germany's influence on world politics....   [tags: Papers]

Better Essays
1228 words (3.5 pages)