James Watson And Francis Crick Essay

James Watson And Francis Crick Essay

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In April of 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick published a game changing paper. It would blow the mind of the scientific community and reshape the entire landscape of science. DNA, fully knows as Deoxyribonucleic Acid is the molecule that all genes are made of. Though it is a relatively new term with regard to the age of science, the story of DNA and the path to its discovery covers a much broader timeframe and had many more contributors than James Watson and Francis Crick. After reading the paper the audience should have a better understanding of what DNA is, the most important experiments that contributed to its ultimate discovery and the names and contributions of the lesser-known scientists that helped Watson and Crick turn their idea into one of the most influential scientific discoveries of science in its entirety. These will include the works of Gregor Mendel, Friedrich Miescher, Rosalinda Franklin, and Maurice Wilkins among others, who all helped piece together the puzzle that is the genetic code to life on earth.
Before Crick and Watson used models to build and illustrate the double-helix form of DNA, Gregor Mendel had Pea Plants. Knows as the “Father of Genetics” Mendel is said to have started the conversation leading DNA’s discovery. In 1866, Mendel concluded that genes are formed in pairs and are passed down from parents as distinct units. His experiment consisted of a control plant and he tracked the segregation of those genes in the appearance of them in the offspring. He labeled them as dominant and recessive traits. Through his discovery, Mendel established the rules that future generations of scientists would use in their research. These rules known as “Mendel’s Laws of Heredity” and include three rules. These ...


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As stated in the beginning of the paper, Watson and Cricks are widely known for their publication on the structure of DNA and building the first accurate model showing it to the world. However, I have also shown that there were many more contributing components to their discoveries and a great deal of experimentation along the way. The wealth of knowledge about DNA is owed to the individuals discusses above as well as many others who were not mentioned. These major experiments and the scientists involved in discovering DNA as hereditary material and finding out how DNA’s structure contributes to its function has given the world a look into what makes organisms what they are. These discoveries have and will continue to open up many fields of study have contributed to the forward progression of science and will continue to do so in the future.

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