James Hogg Essay

James Hogg Essay

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Biographical Summary
James Hogg was born and raised in Scotland on his family farm. Hogg only went to school for a few months due to the family bankruptcy. This caused his early introduction into literature to be consisted of the Bible and the stories he was told from his mother and uncle. When he grew older, Hogg received a job as a Shepard’s assistant from James Laidlaw. While working there, Laidlaw taught Hogg how to read, using newspapers and countless theological materials. As Hogg became increasingly better at reading and writing, Laidlaw allowed him to use Laidlaw’s own library, in order to continue his reading career. At Laidlaw’s farm, Hogg began writing, starting out with poetry and songs. Through the poetry, Walter Scott, who launched Hogg’s career by allowing him to write in his newspaper, discovered Hogg. From here, Hogg meet many other literary figures, such as William Wordsworth. Hogg even joined the Maga club, which was a group of prominent literary figures of the time, and begun writing with them, which solidified his career.
Hogg’s writing style is gothic, with a supernatural aspect. This strings from his childhood of religious focus. With the constant reading of the bible, as well as other theological material, Hogg’s writings always have a religious aspect his books as well. This is most prominent in The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, which discuses the Protestant time in America and in England. The novel shows this through the use of a devout brother in contrast to an unholy brother, as well as introducing aspects of sin and devil worship. Hogg’s schooling also prohibited his writing style. This is mainly through the fact that he never had any formal schooling, so he “never re-wro...


... middle of paper ...


...ul, and how he attempts to use this to better the world through murder. Although Hogg was not the best writer, and did not have the best background, he was able to create a piece that everybody should read once in their life.  



Bibliography
Hogg, James, 1770-1835. (1947.). The private memoirs and confessions of a justified
sinner. London: Cresset Press
Hughes, Gillian. James Hogg: A Life. Edinburgh: Edinburgh UP, 2007. Print.
Mack, Douglas S. "James Hogg: Overview." DISCovering Authors. Detroit: Gale, 2003.
Student Resources In Context. Web. 4 Nov. 2013.
Robb, David S. "The Private Memoirs And Confessions of a Justified Sinner: Overview."
DISCovering Authors. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Student Resources In Context. Web. 4
Nov. 2013.
Symons, Arthur. "James Hogg." DISCovering Authors. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Student
Resources In Context. Web. 4 Nov. 2013.

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