James Baldwin 's Influence On The Harlem Renaissance And The Beginning Of The Civil Rights Movement

James Baldwin 's Influence On The Harlem Renaissance And The Beginning Of The Civil Rights Movement

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“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced” – James Baldwin. James Baldwin was one of the single most famous artists, or writers, during the Harlem Renaissance and in the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement. Baldwin grew up in poverty and extremely harsh conditions with a family of nine children, his mother, and stepfather. He knew from the time he was just a young child that writing was his passion and that was what he wanted to do with the rest of his life. Not only was he an excellent student in school with exceptional grades, he was observant of the world around him, and that led him to knowing more about the real world than most people his age (Contemporary). James Baldwin was one of the most insightful and influential writers from the Harlem Renaissance, tackling common problems in his time such as race and sexuality while remaining composed as well as realistic yet hopeful.
James Baldwin was bright from the beginning and everyone seemed to know it. He was born to a single mother, Emma Jones, while never actually knowing his biological father. Throughout his teenage years, Baldwin decided to follow his stepfather’s footsteps and be a minister at a church. After Baldwin found that writing was his passion and decided to write his first novel, he realized that he was questioning the church and his religion. He did not understand why he had to follow and lead the white community, or the people that were against him and had his friends and family enslaved. So Baldwin quit the minister job and focused on his novel; he had to get many odd jobs in order to support himself while he attempted to write since he was no longer a minister (Contemporary).
Knowing his entire life that h...


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...r turmoil, spiritual disruption, the consequence upon people of the burdens of the world, both White and Black.” Baldwin’s writings were so powerful to the people that he decided to call himself the “disturber of peace” because he had the guts to reveal the truths about society when no one else did. Towards the end of his writing career, James Baldwin decided to not only reach out to America, but the entire world (“Ticket”).
James Baldwin is one of the most influential people of not only his time, but even now. He did not believe in separation, he believed that we should all live together and love each other; not as blacks and whites but as human beings. Baldwin was known to just be ahead of his time, he had his eyes set on the future whilst others were not there yet. (Pfeffer). James Baldwin had a huge impact on the world then, and he still continues to every day.

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