Jake and Brett in "The Sun Also Rises": Victims of there Own Environment or Tragically Bringing upon There Own Demise?

Jake and Brett in "The Sun Also Rises": Victims of there Own Environment or Tragically Bringing upon There Own Demise?

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Ernest Hemingway in The Sun Also Rises tried to convey that his characters were not truly “lost” as everyone had come to believe, though only worn down by life’s hardships (Wagner, 1). Mental and physical destruction were side affects that resulted from World War I (Bloom, 1). The title of the book, The Sun Also Rises, even submitted hope to the character’s futures (Wagner, 1). In fact, the characters had enough courage to fight against society and try to uncover the truth or hope within them (Wagner, 1). Jake, a soldier from World War 1, was one of many who come back home with an altered man, with a different view on life.
Brett, who had never stepped foot on a battle field, was shredded from her lover because of the impossible relationship that circumstances thrust upon them. Who is to blame for the tragic situations that had fallen onto Jake and Brett? Were they unfortunate victims of the uncontrollable environment that the government had prevailed upon them? Or were they themselves in the end the cause for there own gloomy collapse? Throughout the issues that face each of the characters, many found alcohol, church, or sexual activity as a way to blind them from their ill-fated positions.
Following the war, Jake had a rather cynical outlook towards life; he never seemed to find the hope he is looking for. Jake, an impotent man as a result from the war, also could not have sexual pleasure as everyone else around him. Usually, Jake was very straightforward with his thoughts speech, and actions (Hinkle, 13). Jake even told many people, mostly his friends, to “go to hell,” once to Mike, and even twice to Cohn (Hinkle, 13). Jake was crude in his speech and did not seem to care of his personal appearance to others. In the beginni...


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...f making it worse.


Works Cited
• Bloom, Harold "Plot Summary of The Sun Also Rises." Bloom's Major Novelists: Ernest Hemingway (2000): 37-42. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. Web. 6 Dec. 2009. .

• Hinkle, James, and Harold Bloom "What's Funny in "The Sun Also Rises.." Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations: The Sun Also Rises (1987): 133-149. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. Web. 6 Dec. 2009. .

• Wagner, Linda W., and Harold Bloom "The Sun Also Rises": One Debt to Imagism." Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations: The Sun Also Rises (1987): 103-115. Literary Reference Center. EBSCO. Web. 6 Dec. 2009. .

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