Invisible Man Ends With The Narrator Essays

Invisible Man Ends With The Narrator Essays

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Invisible Man ends with the narrator running away from the police for being accused of doing something he did not do. Scenes like this from a novel that was written sixty years ago can still be recognizable to readers today because of police brutality. Since the narrator was near Ras the Exhorter, he was guilty by association. Other unfortunate events led the narrator to be expelled from school, unemployed, and released from his organization. There was always a person of higher position over the narrator who had a distorted view of race relations. The Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines white supremacy as “the belief, theory, or doctrine that white people are inherently superior to people from all other racial groups, especially black people, and are therefore rightfully the dominant group in any society,” (“white-supremacy”). It also involves the idea that racism and discrimination do not exist because the law protects segregation. However, as more African-Americans devised plans to stand up for their rights, their images were portrayed as rebellious. The issue is not the rebellion. The narrator’s inability to achieve his true identity is not a reflection of his racial background. The narrator is unable to grow throughout the novel because he is trapped in an era of extreme white supremacy.
As stated before, the narrator was sent to New York by Dr. Bledsoe for exposing the stories of Mr. Trueblood and the African-American veterans to Mr. Norton. In chapter six, Bledsoe explains to the narrator that Mr. Norton did not know what he really wanted, so that is why he asked the narrator to take him to Mr. Trueblood. He thought of the narrator’s actions as limiting the progression of black students. In order to get ahead with th...


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...Mary was willing to help him get to the point in his education and career that he wanted to be, yet he still was influenced by the Brotherhood. Their ability to make him feel as if they could give him his own sense of being before he could even find it himself reveals how powerful Eurocentric persuasions are. Since the Brotherhood could provide him with steady income and housing, he chose to believe their motives. Also, their organization was already well fulfilled with many members, so it seemed like a valid way to finally have your feet planted in a stable situation. As said earlier, the only identity this gives the narrator is the identity of everyone else in the Brotherhood. There is no room for individuality. Although Pan-Africanism was one of the most affluent movements, it allowed African-Americans to seek their own identity, by first recognizing their roots.

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