Essay about Invisible Alligators by Hayes Roberts

Essay about Invisible Alligators by Hayes Roberts

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The children’s literature piece that I examined was Invisible Alligators by Hayes Roberts. In my analysis of this piece I set out to discover the main themes of this story and how they can be utilized in teaching children morals and life lessons. This topic question is significant as nearly all stories especially those aimed at children have an overarching message that is meant to be perceived by the reader.

The story of the Invisible Alligators is the tale of a monkey named Sari, who experiences a terrible day filled with troubles. After the troublesome day she was going to sit down in her bed when she saw that there was a plethora of invisible alligators beneath her bed. She followed the alligators underground and found that the invisible alligators were the source of not only her problems, but the all of the problems in everyone’s lives. On her way back to her bed after her ecounter with the invisible alligators she came upon numerous challenging problems, such as a broken bridge and was able to solve all of them. The main moral themes that I believe are displayed more than superficially in this story are: Bad things happen to everyone, along with finding justification as to why bad things happen, and that one learns to succeed through perseverance through in facing challenges and dilemmas.

In this story the concept that bad things happen to all people and that there is nothing that one can do about it is a central theme and lesson for the reader to learn and develop. When Sari follows the invisible alligators from her bed to their alligator catacombs she learns that that the alligators are the cause of all the worldly problems in everyone lives. The alligators say, “In this house I’m hiding the remote and this sheep...


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...e story when the invisible alligators take Sari into their headquarters and show her the record of the problems that they have cause her in her life, along with everything that she had learned as a result of theses problems.

In reading and analyzing Hayes Roberts story Invisible Alligators I set out to discover the main themes of this story and how these themes can teach children morals and life lessons that can be applied in their own lives. The main moral themes that I believe are displayed in this story are: Bad things happen to all people, good and bad, along with justification as to why bad things happen, and that one learns to succeed by overcoming difficult challenges. Theses conclusions that I have drawn from the question are significant because they describe the overall message I believe that Hayes Roberts is trying to portray to the reader in his piece.

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