The Invention Of The Scientific Revolution Essay

The Invention Of The Scientific Revolution Essay

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By the 17th century, certain scholars were losing patience with the unsatisfactory answers of traditional authoritative texts to explain natural enigmas. Furthermore, thanks to the Protestant Revolution, religious fanatics began appearing among the laity, and the practice of witch hunts became rampant throughout Europe--spreading fear and confusion in a desperate attempt to restore confidence in traditional authoritative texts such as the Bible. Consequently, when certain scholars such as Galileo Galilei began to exclude scripture or ancient texts from their research, a huge uproar awoke among high religious officials and fanatics alike. However, scholars such as Francis Bacon would soon advocate the importance of factual data, devaluing the need to only derive authority from scripture and classical antiquity. As Europe progressed, and more organizations began supporting Science, more scholars similar to Galileo and Bacon such as Johannes Kepler and Isaac Newton would begin abandoning traditional methods of study for the new learning. In 1687 Isaac Newton would publish Principia--one of the most important books in the history of Science, and only one of the many products of the Scientific Revolution. Although it’s clear what the Scientific Revolution inspired, the historical forces that created the Scientific Revolution were the formation of social institutions to support natural philosophers, as well as the development of a Scientific method through empiricism to universally improve research, experimentation, and credibility.
The practice of basing research off of empirical evidence and inductive reasoning was becoming more common among contemporary scientists--such as Francis Bacon and Johannes Kepler-- replacing traditional ...


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...c Revolution. As a result, humanity learned that Science requires a group effort, and the analysis of data has to be unbiased in order to maximize accuracy and efficiency. In addition, people also began to realize that even the most brilliant minds are capable of creating human error. This is similar to how in the Enlightenment period most ideas did not become influential until a general body began to support it. The products of the Enlightenment would also prove the point that seemingly divine interpretations can be wrong. Like the scientific interpretation of Aristotle--who almost completely dominated European thought, and seems almost godlike to the scholastic community of Europe--the dominant rulers in France and England in the 18th century would be contradicted; establishing a constant cycle of revolution which seemingly correlates as a natural law of nature.

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