Informed Consent For Medical Treatment Annotated Bibliography Essay

Informed Consent For Medical Treatment Annotated Bibliography Essay

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Informed Consent for Medical Treatment Annotated Bibliography
Ingravallo, F., Gilmore, E., Vignatelli, L., Dormi, A., Carosielli, G., Lanni, L., & Taddia, P. (2014). Factors associated with nurses’ opinions and practices regarding information and consent. Nursing Ethics, 21(3), 299-313 15p. doi:10.1177/0969733013495225
In this peer review journal article, based on a cross sectional survey conducted in a large Italian teaching hospital, the authors seek to examine nurses’ opinions and practices regarding information and consent and explore the possible influences such as gender, age, education, professional experience, and care setting. The results suggested that though nurses regularly informed patients about medications and invasive nursing procedures and asked for consent prior to invasive procedures, the main difficulties encountered in providing information were lack of time or opportunities and patients’ inability to comprehend information, and the care setting was a significant factor associated with nurses’ opinions and practices.
The study is clear and well organized. The research and analyses methods are adequately explained and displayed and the authors provide a thorough literature review discussing previous knowledge on the topic. The results of the study are clearly shown and discussed regarding its implications. The researchers were aware of the study’s limitations and note them in the article. Limitations such as concerns regarding validity, reliability due to using an ad hoc survey, generalizability outside of the hospital setting, and the absence of a parallel study exploring patient experiences. Though it is suggested that further research is needed to confirm the findings for other care settings, this researc...


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...re shown by a clear and structured presentation of the combined themes that were identified in the data analysis of the interviews and discuss groups. Limitations of the study are discussed, such as the generalizability of the results due to the study being conducted in one setting. The report suggests further studies be conducted among larger populations in different settings and cultures and the explorations into the views of patients also. Overall, the research provides a respectable in depth look into the role of nurse’s in the informed consent process within a hierarchical and communal setting. The research is relevant to nursing especially in paternalistic settings, where nurses’ and doctors’ roles are not regarded as complementary, and/or when working with family orientated cultures, where the patient’s family has a strong influence on health care decisions.

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