Indigenous Australian Land Rights On Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islanders

Indigenous Australian Land Rights On Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islanders

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Indigenous Australian land rights have sparked controversy between Non Indigenous and Indigenous Australians throughout history. The struggle to determine who the rightful owners of the land are is still largely controversial throughout Australia today. Indigenous Australian land rights however, go deeper than simply owning the land as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have established an innate spiritual connection making them one with the land. The emphasis of this essay is to determine how Indigenous Australian land rights have impacted Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, highlighting land rights regarding the Mabo v. the State of Queensland case and the importance behind today’s teachers understanding and including Indigenous history in the classroom environment.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have resided in Australia for at least 60,000 years with an extraordinary relationship to the land and sea. The connection Indigenous Australians have with the land was established, and maintained, by The Dreamings, passed down through generations binding Indigenous Australians to the land (National Film & Sound Archive, 2015). National Film & Sound Archive (2015), highlight that land and being can not be separated for Indigenous Australians as they form part of the land and are accountable for the preservation of the land. Indigenous Australian land rights originated from an intricate social process constructed on traditional core values; where the rights of the land were established on principles of descendants, kinship and marriage (Dodds, 1998). However, despite this, the British colonisation of Australia in 1788 brought about change when the land was declared Terra Nullius (Short, 2007). Short (2007) stated ...


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...ng historical events, educators are required to be aware of the composition of their class and how the background of each child may affect their learning capabilities (Nichol, 2011). For instance, Nichol (2011) states that for many Indigenous Australian students, English is their second language so their oral and written skills may not be up to the same standard as their cohorts. This requires the teacher to devote a considerable amount of time to oral and written skills to bring the students in line with the curriculum developmental standards (Nichol, 2011). Likewise, teachers may need to incorporate additional methods of learning strategies, including, hands on learning, visual learning aides and physical and spiritual learning environments, to provide opportunities for all students to adapt to formal learning environments and succeed (Sveiby and Skuthorpe, 2006).

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Indigenous Australian Land Rights On Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islanders

- Indigenous Australian land rights have sparked controversy between Non Indigenous and Indigenous Australians throughout history. The struggle to determine who the rightful owners of the land are is still largely controversial throughout Australia today. Indigenous Australian land rights however, go deeper than simply owning the land as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have established an innate spiritual connection making them one with the land. The emphasis of this essay is to determine how Indigenous Australian land rights have impacted Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, highlighting land rights regarding the Mabo v....   [tags: Australia, Indigenous Australians, Native title]

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