Immigration Reform : The United States Essay

Immigration Reform : The United States Essay

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If you have ever worked with a green card immigrant or even an illegal immigrant you know that their work ethic is strong and reliable. However, does that mean our government should give them automatic legal status? This has been quite the political issue for some time now and the government cannot come to any agreement on how to figure this problem out. I am going to briefly argue that immigration reform can affect the U.S. economy, the U.S. workers, and the taxpayers.
Legalization, whether it is the right thing to do or not, both sides of the table are trying to argue what the impact legalization would have on the economy. The Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), “argue that legalization would entice more foreigners to cross the border illegally and thus become a burden to the already ailing U.S. economy by draining government-funded programs” (Ordonez). Advocates deny it, “but would-be illegal immigrants do respond to perceived changes in U.S. enforcement policy” (Frum). No one can deny that if a door was opened for an opportunity for a better life for your family they would take it, and most likely by the millions. This country was built by immigrants; we just don’t need that surge of immigrants at this time. The 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) legalized nearly 3 million illegal immigrants, and even though reports have shown that wages for the undocumented have “gone up since then by 15 to 20 percent, it does not prove that it will boost the economy” (Ordonez). In order to boost the economy, one would have to invest into the economy, this is not happening in most cases. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, “Illegal immigrants residing in the U.S. send $50 billion in the remittances to the...


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...vantage of at least one welfare program; and about a third of the households headed by immigrants from Central America, Cuba and Columbia use the welfare system. In contrast only 18 percent of native households receive welfare assistance (Camarota).
His numbers were from 2004, which was after the 1986 IRCA. Just think of what the numbers are today and then add 11 million more immigrants to the population.
In conclusion, I have argued how Immigration reform will affect the economy by sending money back to their country, U.S. workers by not allowing supply and demand for employers, and on taxpayers by draining public services. Immigration is not a bad thing but the goal of reform should be an immigration system that allows in fewer low-skilled or uneducated immigrants. Maybe our government should enforce the current immigration laws; I feel that would be a good start.

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