Essay on Immigration Perpectives in US

Essay on Immigration Perpectives in US

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Starting with the first pilgrims immigrating to the United States in the early 1600s, immigrants have been coming to American in search of religious freedom and the opportunity to make more money. The United States is a country that was founded by and has grown exponentially as a direct result of immigration. A survey from the United States Census Bureau in 2009 showed the current number of immigrants living in America was 38,517,234. (http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/frequently-requested-statistics-immigrants-and-immigration-united-states-1) Each immigrant from around the world brings with them culture, lifestyle and religious differences that may seem strange or odd when compared to our current cultures. The ability to understand each of those cultural differences is a necessary learning tool that will allow us to move beyond boundaries of oppression, prejudice, hatred and conflict. We can also look at younger generations trying to make a place for themselves in our society. With a strong desire to be different than their parents, socially or professional, children maturing into adults will bring a wide variety of cultural changes and differences that older generations struggle to understand and see as odd, possibly even dangerous. Max Weber’s sociological philosophy for analyzing different values, morals and lifestyles with a neutral view point could be considered the only way we can grow as a society, integrate different ways of life into the giant melting pot of our world and understand younger generations, immigrants, neighbors or coworkers through their eyes.
Max Weber was a member of economic departments at Freiburg University (1894) and Heidelberg University (1894). During his secondary education, Weber st...


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The Global Religious Landscape. (n.d.). Pew Research Centers Religion Public Life Project RSS. Retrieved March 8, 2014, from http://www.pewforum.org/2012/12/18/global-religious-landscape-exec/
Value Neutrality in Sociological Research. (n.d.). Boundless. Retrieved March 8, 2014, from https://www.boundless.com/sociology/sociological-research/ethics-in-sociological-research/value-neutrality-in-sociological-research/
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