Immigration During The United States Essay

Immigration During The United States Essay

Length: 1029 words (2.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Immigration in America in recent years has continued to rise steadily. Why? What do they want? Do these immigrants even contribute to society or are they just simply here to do diabolical deeds? Jie Zong and Jeanne Batalova assert “In 2013, approximately 41.3 million immigrants lived in the United States, an all-time high for a nation historically built on immigration” (par.1). Every year millions of immigrants migrate into the U.S looking for better job opportunities or searching for freedom that is limited to them elsewhere. Reporter Janelle Ross contends “America is a much more diverse country — in every region — than it was during the last century. That is largely due to the nearly record-topping share of the country 's population that is comprised of immigrants, from areas of the world in which people were once forbidden to migrate to the United States. These trends, taken together, have transformed the makeup of the U.S. population “(par.1) Thus, Immigrants have become such an essential part of America’s society. Many Americans have come to acquire a sense of gratitude for how prosperous Immigrants have made the U.S. But, in actuality, many Americans disagree profusely causing tension in both society and politics. Because of the steady escalation of immigration every year, the U.S government should not deport these immigrates but admit them as a vital part of society making them residents on the path to citizenship legally. Immigrants Occupy low-paying jobs that most Americans are unwilling to do. So, in this instance immigrants would not be taking away important jobs from Americans but, fulfilling and contributing to the America’s economy.
Immigrants have solidified what has now become a more lucrative and flourishing Ameri...


... middle of paper ...


...Miller states that America has become a thriving nation with immigrants who have paved the way and continue to do so in the multitude of ways. Debra makes a valid point why try to throw out an integral piece of a puzzle? There 's blood, sweat and, tears built on what so many have become a part of. Immigrant’s assimilation into society is what has made America what it is now.
Thus, individuals have different responses and actions that they think should be taken when it comes to how many immigrants are coming into the U. S every year. In the upcoming 2016 election, many are keeping their ears open to different strategies that politicians are putting forth on the table about immigration. However, what so many fail to realize is that immigrants are essential. Just think about what makes the America so unique and what we represent. Why take that all away in the end?

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Immigration During The United States Essay

- Immigration in America in recent years has continued to rise steadily. Why. What do they want. Do these immigrants even contribute to society or are they just simply here to do diabolical deeds. Jie Zong and Jeanne Batalova assert “In 2013, approximately 41.3 million immigrants lived in the United States, an all-time high for a nation historically built on immigration” (par.1). Every year millions of immigrants migrate into the U.S looking for better job opportunities or searching for freedom that is limited to them elsewhere....   [tags: United States, Immigration to the United States]

Better Essays
1029 words (2.9 pages)

Immigration During The United States Essay

- What is the benefit to this country of deporting hundreds of thousands of families even when most of these immigrants are not a threat to the the country’s security. Many laws and acts that have been made all to try to figure out what to do with illegal Immigrants. For example the Immigration Service in 1891, Naturalization Act in 1790, Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882, The Quota system from 1900 to 1921, border control on Canada and Mexico in 1924 and so many more. So many races like Chinese, Japanese, Mexicans, Canadians come here to the United States either legally or illegal....   [tags: Immigration to the United States]

Better Essays
1261 words (3.6 pages)

Illegal Immigration During The United States Essay

- On November 12, 1954, the once bustling immigration inspection port at Ellis Island was shut down after more than 62 years in operation. Opened in 1892, the small island in New York Harbor served as the processing center and point of entry for more than millions of new arrivals to the United States. The island has since become a historical and often controversial symbol of the plight of the immigrant, and it is estimated that “more than one-third of all Americans can trace their lineage to someone who passed through its doors”(history.com)....   [tags: Immigration to the United States]

Better Essays
932 words (2.7 pages)

Illegal Immigration During The United States Essay

- Illegal immigration in the United States has skyrocketed recently and it is causing a major problems for the American people. The problems all started with the increased flow of immigrants in the 1960’s when congress did away with the nationality quota system for immigration that was previously used. This allowed for a large influx of immigrants from mexico and for the new method of immigration called “chain immigration.” This was a method where immigrants could bring their family members into the country with them once they were here themselves....   [tags: Immigration to the United States]

Better Essays
2001 words (5.7 pages)

Essay about Immigration And Immigration Reform During The United States

- In the United States, the topics of immigration and immigration reform are extremely controversial topics at this current time. Also since, the U.S. is known as a “Nation of Immigrants” and with the ongoing situation with the U.S. – Mexican border, the two topics are of heightened importance. From the readings it is mentioned quite a few times that are approximately 11 million illegal immigrants living in the United States. That is indeed a lot, if any country had that many illegal immigrants, I am sure they would want to do something about I; hence the immigration reform....   [tags: Immigration to the United States, United States]

Better Essays
729 words (2.1 pages)

The Legal Case Of Immigration Proceedings Adversely Affect Large Numbers Of Children During The United States

- The absence of government-appointed legal counsel in immigration proceedings adversely affects large numbers of children in the United States. Children born in the United States to parents without citizenship status (U.S.-born children of noncitizen parents or UCNP) are harmed by a parent 's detention and removal. Unaccompanied alien children (UAC) who have entered the country without legal status are adversely affected by their own detention and removal. Unaccompanied, undocumented children face- uphill battle for justice and the right to life here in the United States....   [tags: Law, Human rights, Common law]

Better Essays
1285 words (3.7 pages)

Immigration During The Colonial Era Essay

- Immigration has been part of America since before the 17th century. America has evolved into what it is today due to immigration; however immigration as negative effects as well. Immigration is the building blocks for America. Every one that lives in America today are here because their ancestors immigrated here long ago. Over the years immigration as evolved into a more sophisticated matter. There are many laws they have been put in place to monitor and stop immigration. Immigration I a big factor in America but must be done correctly to insure Americas safety....   [tags: Immigration to the United States, Immigration]

Better Essays
1159 words (3.3 pages)

The Role Of Control Over Immigration During The 1940 ' S Essay

- Midterm Countries all across the world experience population growths, and population declines. Governments have had all sorts of different regulations and incentives to hinder or promote population growth. Some governments, like America, have blocked out certain groups, for example the Chinese (Oriental Exclusion Acts), from immigrating. On the contrary, the American government in the 1940’s started the Bracero Program to bring Mexican’s into the United States as contracted laborers. There are many examples of control over immigration from the government, and the differences between the 20th and 21st centuries are complex and interesting....   [tags: United States, Immigration to the United States]

Better Essays
1160 words (3.3 pages)

The Attitudes Of Immigrants During The United States Essay

- Upon further research, there has been a lot of discrepancies among different age groups. Opinions about immigrants varied greatly among different age groups and generations according to researchers, “There are striking generational differences in attitudes about immigrants. More than two-thirds (68%) of young adults (age 18 to 29) say that immigrants coming to the U.S. strengthen the country, while fewer than one in five (19%) say that immigrants threaten traditional American customs and values....   [tags: Immigration to the United States, United States]

Better Essays
1010 words (2.9 pages)

Immigration During The 1965 Immigration Act Essay

- Findings In this section, Americans’ attitudes toward immigrants before and after the 1965 Immigration Act are analyzed. Next, evidence about the 1968, 2008, and 2012 campaigns and what efforts/methods were utilized to attract immigrants is presented. Finally, the effect of coverage of immigration in the media on the political participation of immigrants is discussed. Changing Views of Immigrants Although Americans’ opinions of immigrants have become considerably more favorable post-1965, they were not always that way....   [tags: Immigration to the United States, United States]

Better Essays
1599 words (4.6 pages)