Essay on Immanuel Kant 's Categorical Imperative

Essay on Immanuel Kant 's Categorical Imperative

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Immanuel Kant’s Categorical Imperative and John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism are two schools of thought that view morality differently. Both Kant and Mill understand and agree that some form of morality exists. They both recognize that the concept of morality applies to all rational beings and that an action can be deemed as moral or immoral based on reason. Despite being reasonably in agreement about what morality is; there are numerous important differences between Mill and Kant’s perception of morality. Kant believes that there is a supreme principle of morality which he referred to it as the Categorical Imperative, whereas Mill held a Utilitarianism view on morality. The fundamental difference is that Kant’ Categorical Imperative holds the belief that morality is about good intentions and motives rather than the consequences of an act to be moral, while the Mill’s Utilitarianism asserts that the purpose of morality is to ensure utility for the greater number of people rather than the intention or motive behind the action. In this paper, the argument of morality pertaining to Immanuel Kant’s Categorical Imperative and John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism will be discussed.
According to Immanuel Kant, people’s morals are categorical imperative. This means that our actions are conscious driven and that our intentions are bounded in rationality to fulfill one’s duty. For Kant, morality should be necessary and universal (Kant, 2005: 49) He provides that actions must be universal and be based on a set of moral rules in order for them to be classified as moral or immoral. Reason is a main component of Kant’s argument of morality. Kant’s view of morality is premised on the notion of “good will,” which ultimately ensures that an act compl...


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...Kant’s Categorical Imperative holds the view that morality should be examined on a rationale level and that its moral value can be determined based on the universality of the act. In contrast, Mill’s Utilitarianism believes that the moral value of an act should be established on the basis of whether the action provided utility for the greater number of people. Mill considers the consequences of an action while Kant is also concerned about the motive or intent behind an action or decision. After examining both Kant and Mill’s arguments, it can be said that they both have great views on morality; regardless of having different opinions. Morality is imperative to both Kant and Mill. They both seek to understand morality and the role of ethics in society. The fact that they disagree on some things but agree on others is what makes their views on morality significant.



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