Essay on The Idea Of Thunder By William Faulkner

Essay on The Idea Of Thunder By William Faulkner

Length: 1004 words (2.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

A practicing sociologist has the gift of being able to recognize things that many people spend their entire life in ignorance of. These “things” are what construct an individual person’s sense of reality are ideas that very often differ culture to culture. To further explain this meaning, a person can consider the idea of thunder. In a Westernized culture, many people will hear the loud noise and automatically associate it with a storm. However, in other cultures some people may immediately think that their gods are angry with them and thus cause the sounds in a fit of rage. The interesting thing about this is that both ideas are a direct result of the culture and language in which the individual was raised or adapted into. Their individual culture has conceived its own unique idea as to what the sound is created from. The once nameless, or unidentified, happening suddenly came to mean something to the specific cultures. The importance is not drawn from what the sound actually is, but instead by how the groups of people identify it. Their language molds and shapes the way that people live and move throughout their “reality”. The sounds that they use to name the “things” is incredibly important in recognizing why the people react the way they do. In the example of thunder, it’s not that the Westernized people are directly reacting to the sound for fear of the actual sound, but instead by the fear that a storm may be coming. Likewise, the person who hears thunder and believes the gods are angry might react with fear and recant their sins or wrongdoing to their gods, not the thunder. Both groups of people use the knowledge they’ve been given through their culture and language to explain the things that they couldn’t independently exp...


... middle of paper ...


...om what they know, they believe that it is a violation of the ways things should be. They become ignorant of the cultures that they may be right in the middle of by comparing them to the culture that they are familiar with and grading it on a scale. This causes a level of unwillingness to change institutions within a society because they are the standard. This makes it exceedingly difficult to relate to other people and the world as a whole because when someone is always trying to look at something while envisioning it as something else; they will never fully see the beauty of what they are observing. They limit their own experience for the sake of comfort and security, for the safety found within the familiar. Ethnocentrism is the safety blanket for many people yet the enervation that prevents them from fully experiencing the world and all of its different cultures.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

A Rose for Emily, by William Faulkner Essay

- People often stick to tradition, but does that mean tradition is proper. Throughout time, many things in life change, but sometimes things stay preserved. The past is the past and cannot be altered, but things can become spoiled, whether by nature or by man. Gender representation has come a long way in the past few hundred years. To this day life is still not equal for either group. The genders have portrayed for millenniums certain duties and created imageries people associate with both, and will not go away overnight or in a century, possibly not even in a millennium....   [tags: a rose for emily, william faulkner]

Better Essays
860 words (2.5 pages)

A Rose For Emily By William Faulkner Essay

- A Rose for Emily William Faulkner 's “ A Rose for Emily ” illustrates the extremes that someone may be driven to in the face of the “ loveless ” life that Miss Emily’s father created for her by driving away all the potential suitors. The major and minor events in the story help develop the plot idea that in the progress from an aristocratic but romanticized past to a more egalitarian present and future. Emily represents the standards and attitudes of the old south, and her inability to accept the changes of the new generation, leaving her even more isolated than ever....   [tags: William Faulkner, Southern United States]

Better Essays
1351 words (3.9 pages)

A Rose For Emily By William Faulkner Essay

- Often, people are bombarded with the possibility of change, but in many cases, “People don’t resist change. They resist being changed” (Peter Senge). In William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily”, Faulkner discusses the upbringing and demise of Emily Grierson through many life altering events. Her Father died, the world around her has changed, and her lover abandoned her all throughout the course of the story. In addition, Faulkner purposefully constructs the story to provoke certain ideas and assumptions....   [tags: William Faulkner, Sartoris, Short story]

Better Essays
1180 words (3.4 pages)

The Sound And The Fury By William Faulkner Essay

- The author of The Sound and the Fury, William Faulkner is considered to be one of the greatest and most influential modernist writers of the twentieth century. The Sound and the Fury happens to be one of his most critiqued and studied pieces. Most essays written about the book focus on either the ideas that the mother is egotistical, cold, selfish or that the daughter retrogressive, impure, and soiled. Faulkner blames the decay of the family unit on the daughter Caddy’s virginity and the loss of her purity....   [tags: William Faulkner, Novel, Absalom, Absalom!]

Better Essays
1124 words (3.2 pages)

Essay on A Rose For Emily By William Faulkner

- Research Paper The short story “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner is about the life of Miss Emily Grierson. Emily is a mysterious character who evolves from a lively and optimistic young girl to a secluded and secretive old woman. Throughout the story many other characters are introduced and assist with the stories progression and conveyance of Miss Emily. Many who have read this tale have given many different opinions about Miss Emily. Many say she is a twisted and demented old woman and others believe her to be a true tragic hero....   [tags: William Faulkner, Short story, Fiction]

Better Essays
1955 words (5.6 pages)

A Rose For Emily By William Faulkner Essay

- ... This can be seen with the dialogue between Emily and the other town members. The dialogue between Emily and the other town members are short. On Emily’s side of the conversation, she is the one who always cuts the dialogue short. She is also very demanding. She firmly tells the new the city authorities “I have no taxes in Jefferson,” and she demands the shop keeper “I want arsenic” (I, III). Emily does not hear no as an answer. Faulkner uses foreshadowing to characterize Emily by comparing her to her great-aunt who had gone completely crazy when she “held themselves a little too high for what they really were” (II)....   [tags: William Faulkner, Southern United States]

Better Essays
1388 words (4 pages)

A Rose For Emily By William Faulkner Essay

- ... They had begun to feel sorry for her, seeing that she was so upset. Losing a dad with a commanding upper hand made Emily feel incomplete and all alone. As humans, we long to have people by our side because we do not like the feeling of being alone. From a reader’s view, we do not actually know what Emily is thinking or feeling. We only know the information that our narrator is giving. Even so, the narrator is unreliable because everything that he/she is telling us is gossip that is heard from other people in the town....   [tags: William Faulkner, Short story, Fiction]

Better Essays
1559 words (4.5 pages)

The Home By William Faulkner Essay

- What is the meaning of the home. In most works of literature, the home is a symbol associated with comfort, family, and happiness. However, in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!, the home takes on a different meaning than in most literary works. In the novel, the home is actually used as a symbol for isolation and hostility. This is not only apparent in descriptions of Thomas Sutpen’s home, where most of the negativity in the novel is cultivated, but the motif of isolation is present in descriptions of Miss Rosa Coldfield’s home as well....   [tags: William Faulkner, Novel, Absalom, Absalom!]

Better Essays
762 words (2.2 pages)

Light in August by William Faulkner Essay

- Light in August by William Faulkner Light in August, a novel written by the well-known author, William Faulkner, can definitely be interpreted in many ways. However, one fairly obvious prospective is through a religious standpoint. It is difficult, nearly impossible, to construe Light in August without noting the Christian parallels. Faulkner gives us proof that a Christian symbolic interpretation is valid. Certain facts of these parallels are inescapable and there are many guideposts to this idea....   [tags: Light August william Faulkner Essays]

Better Essays
1234 words (3.5 pages)

William Faulkner's Use of Shakespeare Essay

- William Faulkner's Use of Shakespeare Throughout his career William Faulkner acknowledged the influence of many writers upon his work--Twain, Dreiser, Anderson, Keats, Dickens, Conrad, Balzac, Bergson, and Cervantes, to name only a few--but the one writer that he consistently mentioned as a constant and continuing influence was William Shakespeare. Though Faulkner’s claim as a fledgling writer in 1921 that “[he] could write a play like Hamlet if [he] wanted to” (FAB 330) may be dismissed as an act of youthful posturing, the statement serves to indicate that from the beginning Shakespeare was the standard by which Faulkner would judge his own creativity....   [tags: William Faulkner]

Better Essays
5391 words (15.4 pages)