Essay on Human Rights Reflection : An Objective Standard Of Justice

Essay on Human Rights Reflection : An Objective Standard Of Justice

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Human Rights Reflection
Overview
Barusch, (2011), states social justice can be defined using one of two approaches: “modern” and “postmodern”. The modern approach is indicative of those that believe justice is an objective, achievable end or goal. Utopian literature often uses this approach by featuring a just society in its writings. The postmodern approach discards the belief of an objective standard of justice, arguing that societies determine what is just.
Bell (1997), vision of a just society is that, “in which the distribution of resources is equitable and all members are physically and psychologically safe and secure. We envision a society in which individuals are both self-determining (able to develop their full capacities), and interdependent (capable of interacting democratically with others)” (Barusch, 2011).
United Nations. (n.d-b), developed their Utopian view of social justice with “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights” based in part, on recognizing the natural characteristic of dignity, that are equal and inalienable rights of all humans as the underpinning of freedom, justice and peace in the world. Article 1 and 2 discuss human beings as being born free and equal in dignity and rights and should make conscious decisions to treat everyone as a brother. The Declaration further states everyone is entitled to rights and freedoms set forth in the Declaration, without malice or discrimination of any sort.
The Declaration, in essence, is that everyone, no matter where you are born, who your parents are, how much money you have, whether you are male, female, black, white, Latin, Chinese, other, homo-sexual, heterosexual, bisexual, transgendered, etc.; everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set...


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...ome Statute of the International Criminal Court lays the groundwork investigation, prosecution and punishment; tens of thousands/millions of innocent people will die for an investigation and prosecution to happen (Benjamin, 2010).
Conclusion
The nonintervention contention of the public international law remains contentious and steps should be taken to begin to address areas of prevention and when the people are physically nourished and there is no longer the threat of safety to their person, they too should be part of the process.
“We the People” is the Preamble to the Charter for Human Rights and those in charge of investigating allegations and observations of crimes against humanity should begin to act more ethically and less politically charged when dealing with the lives of other human beings. Starting with treating others as you would like to be treated.



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