How School Uniforms Are Stereotyped Throughout Children 's School Years Essay examples

How School Uniforms Are Stereotyped Throughout Children 's School Years Essay examples

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Young children take in many influential messages about gender roles and gender stereotypes. These gender roles pressure children to conform to behaviours that may limit their full developmental potential. Gender is a social construction, and other social groups such as race, ethnicity, class, religion, and language also influence that construction. Gender stereotypes are everywhere; it is portrayed in the media, books, popular culture and even in schools in terms of uniforms. This paper will argue the impacts that gender specific uniforms play on education in Australia as eras are changing. The following will be about how school uniforms are stereotyped throughout children’s school years.


-just remember to address the socio-economic issues fairly clearly :) but otherwise this is sounding really good! I am not sure what the issues were so you might have already done it

Paragraph 1 (250 words)- Children’s predisposition of clothing is already embedded from an early age (link to field research)

From birth through to adolescence, the expectations from society and parents of boys and girls to wear gender biased clothing is already clear and distinct. Once starting primary school, the required uniforms reinforce and enhance the gender stereotypes that males must be masculine and females must be feminine. Turner (2013) refers to both private and public male school uniform consisting of shorts or trousers and a shirt, while most schools require females to wear a skirt and blouse or a dress. The traditional female uniform impacts on the girls as it restricts physical activity and movement in the classroom, such as sitting crossed legged on the floor. By requiring males to wear pants and females to wear a skirt or dress, it suggests...


... middle of paper ...


... sexual harassment and modesty policing. Thus, dresses or skirts hamper physical play and create difficulty for children to do physically active games, for example, cart wheels and running.


Conclusion


Clearly, young children have a strong sense of identity and gender roles. Children from a very young age develop gender constancy and show rigid standards for what they believe is appropriate for male and female dress and behaviour. For children who have to decide whether to wear a dress or pants is setting them on a predefined gender path, which they may not want to follow and this could affect their education at school. The society has definitely changed in terms of more sports and subjects, such as home economics and design and technology however the school uniforms remain the same. Ultimately gender specific uniforms will impact on young children’s education.

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