How Elizabeth Moon 's Challenge The Way People Perceive Disability Essay

How Elizabeth Moon 's Challenge The Way People Perceive Disability Essay

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How Elizabeth Moon’s Challenge the Way People Perceive Disability
‘Speed of Dark’ by Elizabeth Moon, is a novel that narrates about the life of Lou, who according to the book is different to “normal” (3) people. That is, Lou interacts to the world in an oddly manner. He can see things which other people cannot see, however, he at times does not see the things other people can see. In other words, Moon describes Lou as autistic (5). One of his most pronounced ability is the way he can locate patterns in data (6), in which according to the author they are stunning, complex and strange, and that even computers cannot comprehend. Lou is working for a pharmaceutical company as a specialist, and through him along with the other autistic employees in Section A, their division is the most effective and productive within the corporation and has managed to make huge profit from their work (32). Section A achieved to be effective and productive within the corporation due to extras such as a private gym with a trampoline, music system, private parking lot and dining facilities that enabled the autistic’s to calm their mind in time of stress, to focus their thoughts (83). However, in spite of their contribution, the corporation manager Crenshaw wants autistic employees to change to a “normal’’ person just like the rest employees within the company to cut costs (43). Crenshaw believe the autistics do not have what it takes to be leaders and they are not cost effective. With That is, Lou is going to face one of the greatest challenge in his life, hence the name ‘the speed of dark’.
Elizabeth Moon’s novel is quite a challenger both in general and at personal level. She dedicates the book to her son as well as to other parents whose children ...


... middle of paper ...


...here she says, “I found Lou’s medical doctors involved in his medical trial and boss, Crenshaw rather alarming in their willful pushing of undergoing the treatment, particularly with Lou’s boss who seems to act from a viewpoint of both financial benefit and narrowmindedness” (136).
The author challenges people take on disability is clearly and factual. In spite of difficulty that Lou had in deciding to undergo the treatment process, to her agreeing to it is not because he hates his condition. However, Moon views the initiative as due to the fact that Lou was already growing and changing and hence, becoming “normal,” which is what he thought, needed to become what he wanted in life. After all, Moon expressing to us that it was a fighting choice for Lou and despite his condition and pressure from outside, all that should matters is that it was his choice.


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