Essay How Do Nurses who Work in the Front Line Cope with Death and Suffering

Essay How Do Nurses who Work in the Front Line Cope with Death and Suffering

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Rating: Strong Essays

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About the Study:

Authors
Professional tears: Developing emotional intelligence around death and dying in emergency work, was a study compiled and published in the well known, and reputable Journal of Clinical Nursing by Cara Bailey, Roger Murphy and Davina Porock.

Aim
The research by Bailey, Murphy and Porock set out to explore and research how nurses who work on the front line of a hospital - the emergency department, manage the emotional toll and impact that death, dying and suffering has in their field of work. Understanding plays a big role in the research, rather than any specific goal, discovery or objective.

A point important to note, this study is a follow on from previous research by the authors. A prior paper that featured in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, Trajectories at the end of life in the emergency department, opened discussion on nursing practices in regards to end of life care. This research that followed on however, has more of a focus on the professional development required of nurses, to cope with the death and dying that they experience in their field of work.

Hypothesis
This study in particular didn’t appear to have a distinct hypothesis. There was no real question to pose or answer. What it appeared to be however, was to understand the impact of death and dying on end of life care emergency professionals.

Background
Due to changes in disease patterns and treatment of said diseases, nurses are now exposed to death in a way that is much different to what it used to be. (Degner & Gow, 1998). Considered one of the most stressful aspects of nursing, caring for people that are dying or deceased is a very difficult thing to cope with and adapt to. This sort of care can have a myriad of negative impacts,...


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...clinical nursing, 20 (23-24), pp. 3364-3372.

Gow, C. and Degner, L. (1988) Evaluations of death and education in nursing. A critical review. Cancer Nursing, 11 pp. 151-159.

Kadner, K (1994) Therapeutic intimacy in nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 19 (2), pp. 215--218.

Scholes, J., Albarran, J. W. and Williams, C (2006) Developing expertise in critical care nursing. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Pub.

Hochschild, A. R (1983) The managed heart. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Huy QN (1999) Emotional capability and corporate change. Mastering Strategy 6. 56-57.
Cherniss, C. and Goleman, D (2001) The emotionally intelligent workplace. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Fortinash, K. M. and Holoday-Worret, P. A (2004) Psychiatric mental health nursing. St. Louis, Mo.: Mosby.

Passer, M. W. & Smith, R. E. (2012). Psychology. North Ryde, N.S.W.: Mcgraw-Hill Australia.

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