Essay about Hobbes ' Theory Of Human Nature

Essay about Hobbes ' Theory Of Human Nature

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Hobbes ' theory of the social contract is based on the hypothetical State of Nature. In his book, Leviathan published in 1651, Hobbes has created a theory of human nature that gives a particular view of morality and politics. Hobbes sought to provide a theory of human nature that would equal the discoveries being made in the sciences during the Scientific Revolution. His psychological theory is produced by mechanism where everything in the universe is created by matter in motion. Hobbes views this theory of mechanism to extend into human behavior as well. Human micro-behaviors can be produced by certain macro-behavior. Behaviors such as walking and talking are composed by other actions inside humans; these other actions are produced by the interaction with other humans to generate certain chains of causes and effects, formulating the rise in human behavior that are observable to us. We are then as understandable in terms of universal laws of nature as are the motions of heavenly bodies. The continual fragmentation of memory can be elucidated by inertia. With the increase of more sensory information, the excess earlier impressions ‘slows down ' over time. In Hobbes’ outlook, we are virtually very perplexing biological machines, reacting mechanistically to the stimuli of the world and with the universal laws of human nature.
Hobbes ‘mechanistic theory of human nature implies that humans are self-interested, that men seek what they perceive to be their best interests. Mechanistically, humans respond to being attracted to desires and resist by things they find uncomfortable. Humans are motivated by the aspiration to better our own positions and fulfill as many of our own desires. We are continually and genuinely concerned with our o...


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...bsolute authority in order to escape the State of Nature. For John Locke, however, the State of Nature took on a different form. While Locke uses Hobbes’ methodological device of the State of Nature, Locke sees it at a different end. Locke’s arguments of a social contract gave citizens the ability to revolt against a sovereign were influential on democratic revolutions.
For Locke, the State of Nature is a perfect state of liberty to live life as one sees fit, free from the disruption of others. It is not a state of license that to where a person can do anything they pleases or to be in their best interest. Locke believes the State of Nature is not a state without morality as Hobbes’ would argue. Locke views the Law of Nature as the basis of morality given by God to us, where he mandates the we should not harm one another in their life, health liberty or possessions.

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