The Hippie Generation Changed the World Essay

The Hippie Generation Changed the World Essay

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These young people were growing their hair long, participating in free love, and flexing their flower power. The hippie generation was not all about rebelling againsed their parents or doing drugs and having sex, Hippies are people who believe that the way to peace is love. They believe that in order to love one another it is important that they accept one another for who they are but the people in their time others did not see this. They just saw kids that were breaking the law. They did many wild things that people other than the hippies frowned upon like, doing many different drugs and experimenting with sex, listening to loud music and holding war protests.
One of the Hippie’s foundations was the of the continuous use of illegal drugs and making love to each other. Over 10 years from 1960 when the Hippie’s first started to 1970 more than 8,000,000 people from the ages of 15 to 25 had tried marijuana. This was the main drug of the hippie generation, but was not the only drug used by them. One other main drug used was LSD, some of the Hippie’s thought that LSD “put you in touch ...

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