Hippie Culture in America Essay

Hippie Culture in America Essay

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"I wish we were all hippies and we did yoga, lived and cottages, smoke weed and accepted everyone for who they are and lostened to wonderful music. And i wish money didn't make us who we are, i just wish we could redo society" (Marley, 1968). According to Hippie Culture, (2010)"Being a hippie" was originally born as a subculture, youth movement, which began on The United States of America near the 1960's, it started as a pacifist movement that was againist wars and the bad gobernment. Stated by Hippies, (2009) is being hippies a culture? Is more than a culture. You are envolving thoughts. People say that its just a style or a way to wear cloth, but they dont know what a hippie has in the mind. They focus they're life more in enjoying it because it is very short. Said by Hippies, (n.d.), They create a special connection with nature and they strictly respect it. They're living way is more natural because they obtein everything from nature and are against artificial thingsIt is about beliefs and living the life to the best way trying to have only one objective, to be happy.


Beliefs and living the life to the fullest was they're goal. Some of the main philosophical ideas of the hippies of the ' 60s are that they preferred a style of life free, non-conformist and non-conventional, by removing the material needs, showing a marked distaste toward the Western materialistic culture. According to Hippie Culture, (2005), They were mainly pursuing community life, pacifism, and free love. They were "nuclear pro-desarme", from which originated the slogan "love and peace" and also defended the ecology. Through meditation or with the use of drugs or hallucinogens, they reached a State of alternative spirituality or higher consciousness. ...


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...e and celebration of cultural and ethnic diversity have achieved widespread acceptance even by the majority society. Also their values of sexual freedom (free love) and his quest for forms of alternative spirituality have expansion and acceptance.

CONCLUSION
Many times in life we judge people, ideologies or groups of people that we don't even know, we are simply left with the first intention and use it to criticize. But it is criticism runs out of bases at the moment in which we enter and study of ideology, or the reasons why such a person or a group of them acting in a certain way.
In conclusion, one could say that the hippies are still a popular tribe until our days as there are still people who are admirers of these people, there are also people who currently are hippies, so it arguably being very influential not only for its ideology but also by its way of being

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