The Hippie and Other Movements in The 1970s Essay

The Hippie and Other Movements in The 1970s Essay

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The 1970s was a tumultuous time in the United States. In some ways, the decade was a continuation of the 1960s. Women, African Americans, Native Americans, gays and lesbians and other marginalized people continued to fight for their freedom, while many other Americans joined in the demonstration against the ongoing war in Vietnam. Due to these movements, the 1970s saw changes in its national identity, including modifications in social values. These social changes showed up in the fashion industry as well, delivering new outlooks in the arenas of both men’s and women’s clothing.
The 60s was the period of time when the baby boomers began to grow up and supplement their own ideas. The post World War II Baby Boom created 70 million teenagers for the sixties. This youth swayed fashion into their own favor by moving away from the conservative fifties. Also the fads and the politics of the decade were also influenced by the new generation.
The advancement from conservative to liberal thinking, eventually resulted in revolutionary changes in cultural fabric of American life. The 60s was a decade of sweeping change throughout the fashion world. Previously, fashion was aimed at mainly the wealthy and the mature elites, but as the decade began to unfold, the tastes and preferences of the youngsters became important. Parisian designers dominated the beginning of the decade with their outstanding ability to implement their own ideas into their clothing.
Towards the end of the decade the Hippie movement had a huge impact on the way people started to view clothing. This group rebelled against war, encouraged peace and love. Their presence had a major influence on fashion. They opted for clothing that was natural and comfortable. Accessories w...


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...d women’s fashion to break free from convention. Bras and corsets were seen as symbols of oppression and conformity. They were discarded by many women as many new fads appeared,(). Women also exhibited their newfound freedom by wearing traditional male clothing such as baggy trousers, men's jackets, vests, over-sized shirts, ties and hats.

Men's fashion became more bold and daring throughout the 1970s. The hippie influence of the late 1960s crossed over into the fashion of both sexes. For men, this meant wide, colourful ties and bright, fitted shirts with big collars. Many men grew short beards, sideburns or moustaches and let their hair grow long.
Flared trousers were popular with both men and women throughout the decade - ranging from a subtle flare to huge, flapping bell-bottoms. By the end of the 1970s, however, trouser legs had gradually straightened again.



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