Essay about Hip Hop And The Black American Culture

Essay about Hip Hop And The Black American Culture

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For many, music is a cultural history that brings families together, allowing them to share a common interest. The birth of hip hop ignited a whole new world of music, which lead to vast amount of controversy in the music industry. Hip hop has always been recognized as the platform for the black American culture. Hip hop become a moment that changed the entire music industry, and as the culture progressed it become more mainstream. In today’s music society, it is evident that the white race has become greatly involved with hip hop and the lifestyle that entails this culture. Notorious artists such as the Beastie Boys and Vanilla Ice enabled artists such as Eminem, Miley Cyrus and Iggy Azalea to follow their dreams in the hip hop world. If one acknowledges all the aspect of the hip hop culture such as the type of dance or the graffiti art, does the color of his or her skin really matter? It is clear that these artists have tested this theory, and have results that are shocking. White artists are becoming more accepted and appreciated for their music and are being mentors for the hip hop community. As a result of the outbreak of hip hop out of the Bronx, all races were able to enjoy and love the culture of hip hop. It is no longer an African American predominance, but instead it is a movement.
Jay-Z states “That 's why this generation is the least racist generation ever. You see it all the time. Go to any club. People are intermingling, hanging out, having fun, and enjoying the same music. Hip-hop is not just in the Bronx anymore. It 's worldwide. Everywhere you go, people are listening to hip-hop and partying together. Hip-hop has done that.” Hip hop has truly defined the musical world. No longer is hip hop just considered the ...


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...that the Beastie Boys had over other rap groups was their interaction with black artists. For more than 25 years, the Beastie Boys produced and put out records. Russell Simmons who was head of Rush productions was attracted to the group of boys (Stratton). As the group continued to spark the interest of others, Def Jam eventually signed the group. This group of young men was intriguing to many because one they were white and two because they told a story and inspired other white rappers and artists like Vanilla Ice and Eminem to produce. As time when on, this group began to gain the respect of the black artist making it easier for their songs to be song. If the black community did not support the work of the white artists, there would have been no way that this white artist could have thrived. In some way they needed the blessing of the black artist to succeed.

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