Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome ( Hus ) Essay

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome ( Hus ) Essay

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Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome
Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) is a rare condition that affects renal functioning and can become life threatening. HUS is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and impaired renal function (IJKD, 2013). HUS will often onset after an infection of Escherichia coli which is a Shiga toxin producing bacteria. Certain medications (Quinine, some chemotherapy drugs, and anti-platelet medications), infections (HIV/AIDS, pneumococcal bacteria), genetics, and even pregnancy can also induce the onset of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (Mayo Clinic, 2013). HUS is in essence a clinical diagnosis that is supported by abnormalities in lab values (AJCP, 2004). HUS is the most common cause of renal failure in children under the age of 5. Immunocompromised adults as well as healthy adults can also experience HUS (Mayo, 2013).
Pathophysiology
Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome often starts with a hemorrhagic bout of diarrhea due to the Shiga-like toxins that are present in E. coli and normally takes between two and 14 days from exposure to develop. Shiga toxins got their name from Shigella dysenteriae which is a dysentery causing bacteria that was first discovered by Kiyoshi Shiga in 1898 (Basu, D. & Tumer, N., 2015). Shiga toxins are ribosome inactivating proteins and cause injury to microvascular endothelial cells within the kidneys, brain and other organs (Bauwens, A., Bielaszewska, M., Kemper, B., Langehanenberg, P., von Bally, G., et al., 2011). Shiga toxins are AB5 toxins which bind cellular ligand glycosphingolipid globtriaosylcermide (Gb3) (Bauwens, A., 2011). The Shiga toxins modify the large rRNA and inhibit protein synthesis (Basu, D., et al., 2015). The toxins remove adenine from the rRNA as wel...


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...a complete recovery but there can be residual effects. Some have irreversible kidney damage and need to have transplants and some have to remain on blood pressure medications to prevent further kidney damage (Mayo, 2013).
Conclusion
Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) is a rare condition that affects renal functioning and can become life threatening. This highly destructive disease can be prevented by simple things such as food safety precautions and hand washing. Food needs to cooked and stored at certain temperatures to inhibit the growth and transmission of E. coli. Hand washing is something that should be done much more frequently then it is, especially after using the restroom and handling food that may or may not be contaminated. It is unfortunate that often times individuals overlook food safety and hand washing and cause other individuals to have to go thru HUS.

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Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome ( Hus ) Essay

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