Essay about The Hebrew Bible And The Bible

Essay about The Hebrew Bible And The Bible

Length: 778 words (2.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The Hebrew Bible contains conflicting and insufficient information, which impacts my views about what the Hebrew Bible says and what the Bible means. It has multiple dimensions. It is evident that various scriptures in the Hebrew Bible do not say what it means, nor does it mean what it says. “Ultimately it 's going to take some detective work in an effort to increase findings to enhance interpretation and more.” [6]
I feel that portions of the Hebrew Bible should be modified, re-investigated, re-instated and re-interpreted to include all God 's people, of all nationalities and religions in fairness and justice.
Why? Based on the fact, that the Hebrew Bible was interpreted by ancient religious authorities, that held racist values. As a result of these racist values, the historical records of the existence of African American people were eliminated from the Hebrew Bible.
Upon discovering this and other myths (the term myth does not necessarily mean that the contents are false or fictitious, myth is used to describe a story that conveys a truth transcending time and the empirical world). Yet, suspicion antennas rose, and are growing higher and higher. I am more inclined to believe that most of the Hebrew Bible has been
2
tampered with in pursuit to control slaves etc. In the process of detective work, when it is all said and done, African American Scholars should be included in the entire process so they can then form decisions for themselves as to which facets of history that should be omitted, included, and interpreted from a different lense. Not from others perspective, but from our own. “That is, texts held sacred by a particular commun...


... middle of paper ...


...rding to Knight and Levine, it is written that “if we look again at these texts and others through the lenses of history, we can see so much more. The stories take on brighter colors, the laws find more profound interpretations. If we understand why these texts were written and how their ancient audiences understood them, we can appreciate them more fully. This informed approach is not the enemy of a faith based
4
reading; biblical scholarship is not, in our view, a weapon designed to destroy one’s religious belief. It is, rather, something that can enhance such beliefs. Indeed, if three or four pages of a book or a single lecture based on a rigorous academic understanding of the Bible cause one faith into question, then that is a faith the needs to be reconsidered.”[44]

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Violence, Power, and Goals in the Hebrew Bible and The Iliad Essay

- ... Sacrifices are, in nature, very violent. Innocent blood is spilled to please the vengeful God. In Exodus 12, "the Lord struck down all the first-born in the land of Egypt, from the first-born of Pharaoh who sat on the throne the first-born of the captive who was in the dungeon, and all the first-born of the cattle" (Exodus 12:29). God did all that just because the Pharaoh stubbornly refused to let the Israelites leave his country. The immense sacrifice of the first-borns of man and beast was an act of violence that led the exodus of the Israelites....   [tags: the hebrew bible, the iliad, literary analysis]

Better Essays
1349 words (3.9 pages)

The Hebrew Bible Essay

- (1) Name and define the three sections of the Hebrew Bible and explain how each section separately and collectively influence the Jewish people. The Hebrew Bible or the Tanak is a collection of sacred literature that profoundly influences the Jewish people. Composed of numerous books, its origins span back to 90 CE, where the destruction of the Second Temple of Jerusalem in 70 CE, forced the Jewish people to scribe the traditions of their temple-based religion. Much of what has been scribed was previously passed down orally through sermons and rituals within the temple, but with no temple, and no way practice their beliefs, a canon had to be agreed upon for Judaism to survive....   [tags: Judaism, Torah, Moses, Book of Genesis]

Better Essays
1813 words (5.2 pages)

Essay The Hebrew Bible

- (1) Name and define the three sections of the Hebrew Bible and explain how each section separately and collectively influence the Jewish people. The Hebrew Bible or the Tanak is a collection of sacred literature that profoundly influences the Jewish people. Composed of numerous books, its origins span back to 90 CE, where the destruction of the Second Temple of Jerusalem in 70 CE, forced the Jewish people to scribe the traditions of their temple-based religion. Much of what has been scribed was previously passed down orally through sermons and rituals within the temple, but with no temple, and no way practice their beliefs, a canon had to be agreed upon for Judaism to survive....   [tags: Judaism, Torah, Book of Genesis, Tanakh]

Better Essays
715 words (2 pages)

Essay on Comparing Biblical And Of Hebrew Bible Creation

- Midterm Essay Question 1: Near-Eastern Creation vs. Hebrew Bible Creation The creation narratives found in the Hebrew Bible often conflict with one another, but mostly build upon ancient near-eastern understandings of creation. These ancient near-eastern understandings provided a foundation from which the Hebrew narratives could distinguish themselves as a people “set apart” from the mainstream understanding of the world. While many accounts of creation deal with questions of where people came from, how the world was ordered and answers to common questions, the Hebrew Bible accounts offer direct attacks on ancient near-eastern ideologies for the purpose of setting apart the biblical audienc...   [tags: Bible, Israelites, Creation myth, Supersessionism]

Better Essays
1574 words (4.5 pages)

Essay about Neurotheology and Prophecy in the Hebrew Bible

- Neurotheology is becoming an increasingly popular strand of theology. Although trances of this branch of theology can be traced back to the 70’s, it really became an area of interest in the mid 90’s. Neurotheology is a process of studying religious and spiritual phenomena with the neuroscientific perspective. This field is continuing to grow and with better technology for neuro-imaging and a growing understanding of the human mind theologians can use this framework to better understand a wide variety of theological concepts....   [tags: ecstatic states, prophecy, God, brain]

Better Essays
2560 words (7.3 pages)

Hebrew Nomads View on the Creation Essay

- ... This is the story the Babylonians would have believed in when they heard Genesis. Genesis starts by saying “in beginning God created the heavens and the earth”. The Bible talks about God speaking things into existence. First God made the light, which He separated into day and night. Next, God created the sky and then the waters. “He called the dry ground ‘land’ and the waters ‘seas’”. This is when God says that “it was good”. God states that his creations are good, which is different from the creations of Enuma Elish....   [tags: Genesis, Hebrew, Bible]

Better Essays
1165 words (3.3 pages)

The Book of Zephaniah in the Hebrew Bible Essay

- Zephaniah 3:9-20 is a biblical passage in the Hebrew Bible that features many different interpretations and can be related to various other biblical passages and stories as well. There are numerous historical and cultural contexts within this passage and the literary genre and structure, as well as theology are themes that are prominent in these verses of Zephaniah. The language and imagery in this particular book of the Hebrew Bible are culturally specific and deeply imbedded in the traditions of the Near East....   [tags: old testament, minor prophets]

Better Essays
1265 words (3.6 pages)

The Context Of The Hebrew Bible Essay

- When I think of sex in the context of the Hebrew Bible, I immediately reflect on how I was first taught about sex. Sex was synonymous with sin, especially premarital sex which was an abhorable. Further I also consider how sex within the institution of marriage is not sin, which implies sex as the act is not inherently immoral, but rather an act, which as the Hebrew Bible suggests, should be reserved for marriage. Husband and wife are permitted to have sex whenever they please as their privilege and duty....   [tags: Marriage, Sexual intercourse, Human sexuality]

Better Essays
1153 words (3.3 pages)

The Christian Bible, the Hebrew Scripture, The Muslim Koran Essay

- The Christian Bible, the Hebrew Scripture, The Muslim Koran: Words are Not Important, Our Actions Are Matt 13:3 "He told them many things in parables. 13:10 "Why do you talk to them in parables?" That's the crucial question: Did God, should God, have intended direct and final communication with us. If so, Jesus certainly failed his mission. There is little evidence that Jesus' appearance cleared anything up or gave us God directly. Wittgenstein, who wanted our language to be clear, knows well enough that neither the Hebrew nor the Christian God's words could fall within his constructed linguistic net....   [tags: Religion Theology Essays]

Better Essays
2277 words (6.5 pages)

Hebrew Bible Exegesis Essay

- The translation and exegesis of the Hebrew Bible , have led to many versions of stories that we thought we knew, especially the book of Genesis and the first fall story . Hebrew words such as adam, and other significant words in Hebrew language will be the main focus on in this paper. These words can have very different meanings according to the exegetes and also of a person's belief system that is translating them. Thorough critical analysis of postexilic writings will cast doubt into believers of their faith that indeed, what they have been taught about the stories of the Bible are just one interpretation....   [tags: Religion]

Free Essays
1543 words (4.4 pages)