The Harlem Community Justice Center Essays

The Harlem Community Justice Center Essays

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The Harlem Community Justice Center is an organization that offers stabilization and legal advice to former inmates in the East and Central Harlem communities. This organization maintains a blog, Re-Thinking Reentry, which aims to diminish recidivism and improve public safety in Upper Manhattan. The Harlem Community Justice Center collaborates with many local service providers that help disadvantaged people and former prisoners to change behavior and attitudes, to improve their lives, to learn new skills, and gain the ability to overcome rejection from society. This community-based organization focuses on eliminating neighborhood problems and inequalities that have a negative effect on the community. These inequalities promote mass imprisonment rates among racial minorities who have obtained no more than a high school education. Harlem Community Justice Center works on the principle of relevance by sustaining long-term partnerships and referrals with dozens of organizations, such as the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services, New York City Council, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision, New York City Department of Youth and Community Development, Robin Hood Foundation, and many other local organizations. With the large amount of partnerships it already has, it may be difficult to determine which of their partners have a say and are active in specific activities. All of these partners focus on different things and have different goals that they want to be seen made into reality. The prevalence of so many partners could result in confutation and tension within the larger organization.
The Correctional Association of New York promotes education a...


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...l law reform, human rights, capital punishment, and Juvenile justice. All of these serve as causal factors of mass incarceration. Not only does the organization work with legislation and the court systems to lessen the upstream effect of mass incarceration, they also provide education on subjects such as what to do if you are stopped by a police officer. Education like this will provide individuals with the tools they need to know the correct decisions to make when facing the law both inside and outside the courtroom. This organization works to liberate those who have been, or will be, mistreated by the criminal justice system. However, a limitation of the ACLU’s tactics create an atmosphere of the police being the enemy. In order for the problem of mass incarceration to be solved, the organization will have to view the police as a helping force instead of the enemy.

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