Essay about The Handmaid 's Tale And The Hunger Games

Essay about The Handmaid 's Tale And The Hunger Games

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Handmaid’s Tale is a dystopian novel about a society, Gilead, that has been formed in the former Boston, Mass. area. The society is theocratic and patriarchal with all woman’s rights stripped away. A quote that briefly describes how women are viewed within in the society is "Gilead constructs women as seen objects instead of seeing subjects." (Kirkvik, Anette. "Gender Performativity in The Handmaid’s Tale and The Hunger Games." University of Norway, May 2015. Web). Men try to not only control women but also how women are viewed, to have total control. The society preaches its main focus is to repopulate the decimated population. Despite women having a less crucial role in society than men, women play a more significant role in the development and outcome of the plot. The reason for this is that the oppressed women crave change. Even those women who aren’t stripped of all there rights, can’t seem to find happiness in this new society. This can be proven through an analysis of the characteristics and actions of different characters in the novel such as Offred, Serena Joy, The Commander, Moira and Ofglen. Other events involving multiple people can also be used such as – stripping of woman’s rights, “servicing” the commander, secret visits with the commander, a visit to Jezebels all that take place throughout the novel. A system that sets up women to want change is the classification of women into classes of importance. This works well for turning different classes of women against each other, but it still brings some of the women together, to right there cause. One of most significant plot developments that is driven by women is Mayday, the rebel group fighting to restore democracy. One twist to Mayday that we discover is that there...


... middle of paper ...


...ayday to go onto a better life, however being a part of the society it may have been a trick, and it could have very well been the proper authorities taking her away to the colonies or worse.


The men in this novel use there power to retain control over women, in order to continue there society that suites them best. Although many men use all the resources they have ignored to restrain women, these women still resist, fight back and change the course of events towards positive change, more than men trying to force the society to remain a negative place. Its a good versus evil scenario. It may not be as apparent that good is prevailing but through the analysis of women, and there actions during extreme oppression proves that the good women in this case are indeed having a more significant effect in the society and its outcomes than men, the evil in this situation.

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