Essay on The Great Plains

Essay on The Great Plains

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If time could be reversed and polar bears saved from the melting ice caps, the idea that someone would not take advantage of that is preposterous. Rewilding the Great Plains may not save the polar bears, though it is a step in the right direction to take better care of our earth. Rewilding, as in bringing back mammals that have not been in their habitat for thousands of years and reintroducing the species to a freshly marked land. Rewilding the Great Plains has the potential to help bring back sustainable agriculture as well as have better reactions to the projected impacts that will occur due to the changing climate. Rewilding the majority of the Great Plains has a number of possible contributions that not only benefit the mammals being reintroduced but the environment and our own economy.
Common thoughts going into the idea of rewilding the large portion of the northwest that is the Great Plains, would be the struggle in transitioning the area and all the profitable land that will be lost to animals and ecosystems. These ideas are sorely thought for, since rewilding the Great Plains will be more beneficial than attempting to keep it as is right now. In order to keep the land as livable, new livestock needs to be introduced in an attempt to save agriculture anyway. If you were to think about the amount of money families spend at the zoo to see animals in a restricted cage, the conceivable profits that a rewilded great plains may bring in in comparison is astounding. The new Great Plains would hold animals that have not been seen in the North American plains in close to 13,000 years as well as possibly even bringing in animals that were never apart of the Great Plains. This has the potential of creating an ecosystem e...


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...ent once again and the loss of property land will reduce emissions as well as spending. For the wild lands once they are able to care for themselves once again will no longer have the need to be tended for by humans thus the less spending. Plus, revisiting the socioeconomic opportunities that come with rewilding and the possibilities of eco tours for those who would otherwise be going to visit animals those of which are unable to show their true wild characteristics. The eco tours will be able to show the meaning behind the process of rewilding the Great Plains if there were ever a need to combat for the maintaining of the space to keep anyone from restoring it to the industrial side. Overall, the rewilding of the Great Plains will bring benefits across the spectrum to our country and could start a rewilding revolution across the world if it were to proceed correctly.

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Essay on The Great Plains

- If time could be reversed and polar bears saved from the melting ice caps, the idea that someone would not take advantage of that is preposterous. Rewilding the Great Plains may not save the polar bears, though it is a step in the right direction to take better care of our earth. Rewilding, as in bringing back mammals that have not been in their habitat for thousands of years and reintroducing the species to a freshly marked land. Rewilding the Great Plains has the potential to help bring back sustainable agriculture as well as have better reactions to the projected impacts that will occur due to the changing climate....   [tags: Great Plains, Dust Bowl, North America]

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