Essay about The Great Gatsby By F. Scott

Essay about The Great Gatsby By F. Scott

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The story The Great Gatsby, written by F. Scott and directed by Baz Lurhmann, is a story narrated in the first person by the character Nick Carraway , about a man called Jay Gatsby , and his love/obsession for a girl called Daisy Fay Buchanan , who is married to a man called Tom Buchanan . In this story, the director uses film techniques like characterization, setting, cinematography, soundtrack, and visual elements to portray particular ideas and themes in the story - but these techniques are over-the-top, inefficient, and sometimes completely unnecessary. Some of the themes of The Great Gatsby that will be discussed here are wealth, hope, and infatuation.
Characterization within film can be either direct or indirect, and in The Great Gatsby, characterization is mostly indirect, however the narrator does occasionally directly describe Gatsby, describing honest, hopeful qualities. Almost every scene with Gatsby in them show similar qualities: always wearing suits or fancy dress, well-mannered speech and posture, and an authoritative but kind attitude. As the movie progresses however, Gatsby’s character flaws become more evident, as he loses his temper and almost punches Tom in the “apartment scene”, and as he flees from the scene in which Daisy runs over Myrtle, Tom’s Mistress. All this allows for the audience to first admire Gatsby, and later relate to him, as we all have lost our temper before.
Baz Lurhmann uses setting in the movie to establish the wealth of some of the main characters and others like them. It does this by showing off the size of their mansions, where their mansions are (by the edge of a calm, beautiful lake), and by the scale of the parties that go on in them. Inversely, some other scenes show extreme po...


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...re used during those parties. Not only was it too much, trying too hard to point out the theme of wealth and extravagance, but it made the scenes confusing – there was so much going on that the addition of excessive light effects made it hard to tell what was going on at all, or pinpoint anything of comparative importance. In reverse to this, some of the characters were given a glow at the right times, like when Gatsby was first physically introduced, and also when Daisy was first introduced.
In conclusion, although film techniques were used in the film to portray themes, and were, on part, successful, they were used too much and on too grand a scale to actually get the themes across efficiently. If the director had toned down some of these over-the-top techniques, the movie may have been more enjoyable and relative to audiences today, as well as easier to understand

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Essay about The Great Gatsby By F. Scott

- The story The Great Gatsby, written by F. Scott and directed by Baz Lurhmann, is a story narrated in the first person by the character Nick Carraway , about a man called Jay Gatsby , and his love/obsession for a girl called Daisy Fay Buchanan , who is married to a man called Tom Buchanan . In this story, the director uses film techniques like characterization, setting, cinematography, soundtrack, and visual elements to portray particular ideas and themes in the story - but these techniques are over-the-top, inefficient, and sometimes completely unnecessary....   [tags: The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby]

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