Go, lovely Rose by Edmund Waller Essay

Go, lovely Rose by Edmund Waller Essay

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The existence of beauty is as dependent on the admirers as much as those who are beautiful. Edmund Waller’s “Go, lovely Rose” and Tony Hoagland’s “Beauty” explore the idea that beauty can be used as a tool to gain opportunities, and how it can anchor those who strive to obtain it. While both poems deal with the idea of beauty, the perspectives that each of them brings for a woman that they know is very different. With the usage of tone, imagery and metaphors, both authors tell the story of how beauty is ephemeral.
The idea that beauty may come in a fleeting moment is captured in Edmund Waller' poem "Go, lovely Rose." In the poem, Waller instructs a rose to deliver a message to the woman he wishes to court. The first line of the poem, "Go, lovely Rose," shows how the rose is personified as the messenger of Waller's affection (Waller 1). Waller uses the image of a rose not only to compare its beauty to that of the woman of his affections, but also to show that his fondness will be short lived if she does not act fast on his intentions. Waller writes, "When I resemble her to thee, how sweet and fair she seems to be" to let the woman know that her beauty echoes that of the young and handsome rose (Waller 4-5). Because a rose is often seen as a romantic and sophisticated creature, Waller uses this metaphor to compliment the woman he wishes to persuade into courtship. Waller writes, "Tell her she wastes her time and me" to show his opinion that the woman should take him up on his offer of love (Waller 2). The tone of the poem shows that the female recipient is especially reluctant when it comes to the speaker's affections. Waller reveals the woman's shy nature when he states, "Tell her that's young and shuns to have her graces spied" (W...


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...n the eyes of the beholder, can be either a gift or an anchor that can pull those who seek it to the bottom of the ocean. For "Go, lovely Rose," beauty is the victory for which one must be ready to compete for. In the case of "Beauty", the speaker realizes that while beauty can help reach a state of happiness, it is also one that can take away from who we truly are. It is important, for those who seek it, to ride its waves carefully so they don't sink. And because beauty does not last a lifetime, it is up to the individual person to showcase the beauty they have within, rather than portray a fake imitation of it.



Works Cited

Hoagland, Tony. "Beauty" The Literature Collection. New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc. eText. Web. 30 January 2014.
Waller, Edmund. "Go, lovely Rose" The Literature Collection. New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc. eText. Web. 30 January 2014.


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