Essay about George Orwell´s Big Brother Analysis

Essay about George Orwell´s Big Brother Analysis

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In society today for the most part, people are free to speak freely, connect with friends and family and stay in touch with what’s happening in everywhere. It’s not unusual think that everyone enjoys the same rights and privileges but in reality this is not so; in some parts of the world speaking one’s mind could result in death, broadcast agencies are forced to have their reports approved and leaders strategize wars and alliances like seasoned chess players. This might all sound very disheartening but is in fact tame compared to the literacy works and ideas conjured up by English author George Orwell in his novel 1984 which depicts fictional life under the cruel and all seeing “Big Brother” regime of futuristic London. During his lifetime growing up with the examples of a Soviet Union and Nazi Germany and later through his military experiences, Orwell witnessed firsthand how easily people could be manipulated and the truth become twisted. It is for this reason that George Orwell’s novel 1984 is an important work of literature because it discusses timeless themes like democracy, censorship, and politics which have all remained highly debated topics in society today.
One of the first obvious and troubling aspects in George Orwell’s 1984 novel is the attack on the civil rights or lack of them among the members of the outer party in Air Strip One. The culture under which individuals have grown up with today has instilled in them ideas of free speech, assembly, and freedom from self incrimination so much so, that individuals feel entitled to these principles and undoubtedly expect that the government will always continue to protect and deliver them. It is precisely these beliefs that cause the reader to have a knee jerk reaction wh...


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...sely points out to the reader’s attention that “The state doesn’t seem to have much power either to limit unemployment or put down violence, what we have to fear is our own ignorance.” (Bloom) The real literary merit of “1984” is that although one might feel it to be exaggerated today; the idea that anything can happen, like the extermination of an entire race or the adoption of radical ideology is always a possibility and to prevent this one must always be vigilant so that history does not repeat itself.



Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. “George Orwell 1984”. New York: Chelsea House, 2007. Print.
Burgess, Anthony. "George Orwell’s 1984." Films On Demand. Films Media Group, 1980. Web. 30 Sept. 2013.
Orwell, George. 1984. England: Everyman's Library, 1992. Print.
Steinhoff, William. George Orwell and the Origins of 1984. The University of Michigan Press, 1976. Print.

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Essay about George Orwell´s Big Brother Analysis

- In society today for the most part, people are free to speak freely, connect with friends and family and stay in touch with what’s happening in everywhere. It’s not unusual think that everyone enjoys the same rights and privileges but in reality this is not so; in some parts of the world speaking one’s mind could result in death, broadcast agencies are forced to have their reports approved and leaders strategize wars and alliances like seasoned chess players. This might all sound very disheartening but is in fact tame compared to the literacy works and ideas conjured up by English author George Orwell in his novel 1984 which depicts fictional life under the cruel and all seeing “Big Broth...   [tags: censorship, freedom of speech, politics, rights]

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