Genghis Khan and the making of the Modern World Essays

Genghis Khan and the making of the Modern World Essays

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When the word “Mongol” is said I automatically think negative thoughts about uncultured, barbaric people who are horribly cruel and violent. That is only because I have only heard the word used to describe such a person. I have never really registered any initial information I have been taught about the subject pass the point of needing and having to know it. I felt quite incompetent on the subject and once I was given an assignment on the book, Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern Age, I was very perplexed for two reasons. One I have to read an outside book for a class that already requires a substantial amount of time reading the text, and secondly I have to write a research paper in History. I got over it and read the book, which surprisingly enough interested me a great deal and allow me to see the Moguls for more than just a barbaric group of Neanderthals, but rather a group of purpose driven warriors with a common goal of unity and progression. Jack Weatherford’s work has given me insight on and swayed my opinion of the Mongols.
Jack Weatherford showed great enthusiasm and passion while depicting Genghis Khan as a great leader, who was responsible for the unity of people and various other accomplishments. He had a very positive attitude toward the subject, although he didn’t set out to write a book about him, but rather on about the history of world commerce. In the process of researching the Silk Road he traveled to Mongolia and gain vital first hand information into the vast accomplishments of Genghis Khan and the Mongols (xxx). He seems upset about previous ideas that many may have believed that highlight his beloved Mongols in anything but a positive and respectful light. He also expresses feelings about later Mon...


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...ed Chinese culture then and still does now. The Mongol Global Awakening caused new technological advancement, such as carpenters using general adze less and adapted more specialized tools. There were new crops developed as well (235). The Mongol preeminence was destroyed as a result of the Black Plague.
The Mongols have influenced many of the concept and idea that we still see utilized today in politics and international relations. Jack Weatherford tremendously changed my insight into the true Mongol and not the barbaric, savage I once thought of just by hearing the word. I resent this research paper a great deal, and I know that I may not get the grade I want, but at least I did learn something new and destroyed the previous thought I had about these people just by completing it so I feel it served its purpose and that’s the only reason my mind was changed.

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