The Fuel Of Cultural Variation

2001 Words9 Pages
The Fuel of Cultural Variation “French fries” are typically classified as an American food, even though the name itself clearly has some sort of underlying cultural convergence. That being said, one of our world’s most interesting phenomenon are not the similarities that bring people together, but rather the meshing of cultural differences that ignite cultural change, also referred to as cultural globalization. Cultural globalization is all around us, and literally occurring every second around the world. People are being introduced to new ideas, new languages, and cultural aspects every single day. Although, cultural globalization receives reactions of all sorts, not always black and white, but rather a sort of ambiguity. According to, “Globalization and Culture,” by Jan Nederveen Pieterse, there are three paradigms (patterns) on cultural globalization. The three paradigms of Clash of civilizations, Convergence, and Hybridization are all apparent in the life of Nazneen as she moves from rural Bangladesh to London and struggles to find balance between maintaining her Bengali culture and adapting to the new Western culture of London, in the novel Brick Lane by Monica Ali. The three paradigms in Pieterse’s book all deal with different views on cultural globalization, and they are all valid since any one of these paradigms can be present at any moment in today’s society. The Clash of civilizations paradigm deals with a more negative outlook on cultural globalization, and is considered to be one of the oldest views on cultural differences and the way society reacts to change. Under this paradigm the cultural differences are absolute and are resistant to change, so resistant that their differences generate rivalry and conflict betwee... ... middle of paper ... ...adigms of Clash of civilizations, Convergence, and Hybridization are all apparent in the life of Nazneen as she struggles to find balance between maintaining her Bengali culture and adapting to the new Western culture of London. Throughout the novel we experience a shift in her attitude as a passive Bangladeshi woman living in London, to a woman who becomes more open-minded about her life and no longer accepts her fate, but instead goes against her fate through cultural mixing and learning to speak English, getting a sewing job and having an affair with a man who abuses her. By looking through the lens of these three paradigms, we are able to see the pros and cons of each paradigm, but the paradigm, which truly resembles a bright future, is hybridization since we live in such a diverse world. References Ali, Monica. Brick Lane. New York: Scribner, 2003. 16. Print.
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