From Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black by Harriet E. WIlson

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Harriet E. Wilson's "From Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black…" and Frances E. W. Harper's "From Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted" and Anna Julia Cooper's "From A Voice From the South: By a Black Woman of the South" all use language to manipulate society into thinking of a new concept: women being equal to men. These women understand that the times are less than auspicious, and they challenge the women's Cult of Domesticity, for women never could procure social or economic rights equal to that of man. African American women are familiar with the hardships of white men sexual abusing them and never having the opportunity to show that they are capable of equal, if not greater than, success if society deems it acceptable. Wilson, Harper, and Cooper use emotion, ethics, ignorance and logic: historical and political in their writing to guide people into thinking about what women have suffered through in order to please society's standards of what the idealistic women should have been and modifies what women aspire towards—equality. First, Wilson's "From Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black…" elicits lonesome emotion because Mag is not accepted by her family or society as a social equal. Instead of living life happily, Mag is forced to exist and question discrimination when she is "deprived of parental guardianship and far removed from her relatives" (Wilson 85) at an early age. African American women have Conflicting emotions of living a happy, purposeful life versus existence arises when Mag's parents cannot provide for her either because of being born out of rape from a white slave owner, or slave parents hope that Mag may lead a better life away from slavery. Next, the society that Mag is unprepared ... ... middle of paper ... ...her readers to remember what the Republicans have done for them. Works Cited Cooper, Anna Julia. "From A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South." 1892. The Prentice Hall Anthology of African American Literature. Ed. Sharon L. Jones and Rochelle Smith. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 1999. 146-153. Print. Harper, Frances W. "From Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted." 1892. The Prentice Hall Anthology of African American Literature. Ed. Sharon L. Jones and Rochelle Smith. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 1999. 88-94. Print. Wilson, Harriet E. "From Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black, in a Two-Story White House, North: Showing That Slavery's Shadows Fall Even There." 1859. The Prentice Hall Anthology of African American Literature. Ed. Sharon L. Jones and Rochelle Smith. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 1999. 85-88. Print.

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