Freedom of Expression: Students in Schools Lacking Some of their Fundamental Rights

1434 Words6 Pages
As the Twin Towers were plummeting to the earth at 8:46 AM of September 11th, 2001, students all over the nation watched the whole catastrophe in their classrooms. Students and teachers cried while others watched in disbelief. Later, on March 19, 2003, President George W. Bush announced that the United States was going to invade Iraq. Eager students began to enlist in the armed forces and displayed their duties, by proudly wearing their military uniforms in school. Now what if a principal or teacher suspended them because they refused to display such a powerful message? A principal and other school authorities have the questionable ability to restrict what students say, do, and/or even think. From the first day of preschool to the day of graduation, there are rules that students must follow. Some rules and regulations are necessary to prevent chaos, but when are restrictions in schools preventing scholars to convey their meaningful ideas and stances? Just like those proud new soldiers, other young adults who express their stances in politics should not be confined. Students all over the United States have the right to practice their rights and freedom of expression in their schools. Throughout American history, schools have always limited students from expressing themselves. That was until the twentieth century when people started to question the ambiguity of limitations of scholars. Monumental court cases such as West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette proved that saluting the American Flag conflicted with some students’ religion. Rights and freedoms are the foundation of America and should not be severely censored within public schools. In Article IV, Section 2, Paragraph 1 of the United States Constitution, the do... ... middle of paper ... ...'s Guide to the U.S. Constitution. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1980. 64. 3. Pascoe, Elaine. "Speech in the Schools." Freedom of Expression: the Right to Speak out in America. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 1992. 94-96. 4. Witt, Elder. "Religion and Public Schools." The Supreme Court and Individual Rights. 2nd ed. Vol. 1. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly, 1988. 5. Leah, Farish. "An Establishment of Religion." The First Amendment. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow, 1996. 70 6. Leah, Farish. "An Establishment of Religion." The First Amendment. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow, 1996. 55. 7. "oligarchy." Def. 1. The New Merriam-Webster Dictionary for LARGE PRINT Users. Merriam-Webster ed. 1989. N. pag. 8. Pascoe, Elaine. "Speech in the Schools." Freedom of Expression: the Right to Speak out in America. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook, 1992. 96.

More about Freedom of Expression: Students in Schools Lacking Some of their Fundamental Rights

Open Document