Forbidden Archeology : The Origin Of Human Civilization Essay

Forbidden Archeology : The Origin Of Human Civilization Essay

Length: 732 words (2.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

When people think of the history or the timeline of human existence, they reference back to the theory of “mainstream science,” which indicates that the human civilization began approximately 6,000 years ago. Which brings into question, what about the time before that? Were there other homo sapiens like us living on Earth? Archeologists, geologists, and historians who attempt to comprehend human antiquity have conducted research on their ideology of human origin. Professionals refer to this as Forbidden Archeology. Forbidden Archeology is the belief that the origin of human civilization is far more ancient than what “mainstream science” claims. Based on the evidence, such as “out-of-place artifacts” (OOPARTS), Ancient Nuclear War, and mysteries of the Giza Complex, it has become more apparent that human origin initiated millions of years ago.
Forbidden Archeology is a topic that does not come about in many people’s lives or conversation, people know little to nothing about the true meaning of Forbidden Archeology. The reason being is that Forbidden Archeology does not make it into secondary literature, in other words, textbooks. There are two types of literatures: primary and secondary. Secondary literature is information obtained by a textbook; whereas, primary literature is the original pieces of text by investigators on their own research. Michael Cremo, a researcher, wrote an entire book on the topic of Forbidden Archeology, stating that the reason why information about Forbidden Archeology does not make it into primary literature is due to the “process of knowledge filtration.” The main reason why Cremo’s and other’s work on Forbidden Archeology do not make it into secondary literature, is because people believe that it will...


... middle of paper ...


...ology Discovered?” he states that “The discovery… of possibly-extraterrestrial nano-artefacts from the upper Pleistocene in the Ural Mountains,” and “more and more mostly spiral-shaped objects have been found, on the banks of the rivers of Narada, Kozim, and Balbanyu in the eastern Ural Mountains” (Neumann). These findings claim that humans have been living on earth for years that of the traditional historical ideology can be accurate.


Forbidden archeology has more to offer than that of the traditional historical science; there are various investigations, data, artifacts, and information that concludes that the human life has been around for many years. Mainstream science does not have much to imply when it comes to the origin of human existence; human life existed thousands of years ago, for they have their own beliefs that human origins has a limited timeline.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay about The Origin Of The Maya Civilization

- The Maya civilization is one of the most original and rich ancient populaces in the world. It is a group of varied ethnicities, common in some traits, but diverse in languages, customs and in history.1 By using the word "Maya " We can give two meanings. The first, of a civilization that flourished from the 4th century B.C. and it had its decline in the 7th century A.D. in what is known as the classical period resurgent in the post-classical period. And the second meaning refers to a people and culture that continues to exist to this day representing a tradition of more than 2000 years....   [tags: Maya civilization, Mesoamerica, Maya peoples]

Better Essays
1047 words (3 pages)

The Origin of Civilization Essay

- The idea of free expression of political thought really came into its own in 18th century Europe. Writers and thinkers like Adam Smith, Rousseau, and Edmund Burke shared their ideas that still give reasons for consideration even today. Rousseau gave the underpinnings for the French Revolution. Smith gave us the foundations for modern economic theory. Burke gave us the idea of Conservatism, which fathered all other -ism's. While all three of these writers gave us so much, it is important to look back and and see not only where their ideas came from, but also how there were in some ways just different interpretations of the same thing, and where they were in stern disagreement....   [tags: Philosophy]

Better Essays
1909 words (5.5 pages)

The Importance of Archeology Essay

- Archaeology is the field of study that focuses on prehistoric human activity. The importance of archaeology is that this discipline can breach our knowledge gaps of the long forgotten epochs of human existence as well as examine artifacts which can serve as evidence for providing explanations of human life in the past. Culture is important to archaeology because it helps explain how lifestyles originate from the essentials and elements of individuals’ lives. Through archaeological findings and excavation techniques, we can discover artifacts, objects, and clues, such as the stone ax, which date back to certain time periods of human presence....   [tags: culture, changing environment]

Better Essays
592 words (1.7 pages)

The Ulu Burun Shipwreck: Underwater Archaeology at its Finest Essay

- Archaeology is a continuously evolving field where there is a constant stream of new branches and excavation methods. Due to the influx of new technologies and innovations in recent decades, archaeologists have been able to excavate previously inaccessible areas. For example, new diving equipment and tools such as proton magnetometers, side-scan sonar, sub-bottom profiler, and miniature submarines have allowed archaeologists to dive into the deep depths of the ocean. As a result, the branch of underwater archaeology was created to search for shipwrecks and other artifacts on the ocean floor....   [tags: Archeology ]

Better Essays
1551 words (4.4 pages)

Talks on Archeology, France and Tutenkhamun Essays

- In the Int 95 lecture this week the Archeology Professor, Stuart Smith, came and spoke to us. He shared with us how when he was in 5th grade he became very interested in the boy king Tutenkhamun and the archeologist who had discovered him, Howard Carter. Smith liked the idea that archeology allowed a person to step back in time, like Howard Carter had. To study archeology Stuart Smith attended Berkley and as an undergrad studied in Egyptian cities such as Luxor, Asyut, and Kom el-Hisn. While doing graduate work at UCLA Smith spent time working in Nubia (Sudan)....   [tags: Archeology, Tutenkhamun, France,]

Better Essays
517 words (1.5 pages)

Origin Of The Egyptian Civilization Essay

- The Egyptian civilization evolved through a series of changing climate, technological developments and a population growing in skills and need for order in a chaotic environment. The earliest origins of Egyptian culture began in the Western Desert now known as the Sahara Desert, but sometime from 11,000 BCE to 6000 BCE the land was lush and full of life sustaining grasslands in which giraffes, hippopotamus and lions thrived alongside a burgeoning pastoral and hunter gather communities. Nabta Playa and Dakhleh Oasis brought about many of the basic cultural developments that were refined and embellished to become a significant part of what makes the Egyptian civilization so unique....   [tags: Ancient Egypt, Egypt, Nile, Predynastic Egypt]

Better Essays
1230 words (3.5 pages)

Essay about Writing Style Used in Foucault's The Archeology of Knowledge

- My first instinct was to avoid this article like the plague because of the author. I knew that Michel Foucault’s work would be densely packed and intellectually challenging. A review of so prominent a writer can be fraught with risk. And yet, I was intrigued. The title of the work, in Foucault’s terms is an énoncé or statement that could have meaning only within the context of a more general discourse. Foucault was speaking not simply about others, but about himself and his relationship to the vast discourse for which he is the author....   [tags: The Archeology of Knowledge]

Better Essays
1095 words (3.1 pages)

Essay about The Growth of Civilization

- When you stand in front of the mirror, has it ever occurred to you that you belong to a particular civilization and your clothes, culture, language and may be even some of your personality traits are a mark of the particular civilization. The origin of civilization may interest you but, the growth of civilization is far more an important aspect of the same. The growth is considered to be a mark of development of a civilization. On the contrary, sustainable growth of civilization is something that would ensure the continuity of the progress of the civilization....   [tags: World Civilization ]

Better Essays
1338 words (3.8 pages)

Underwater Archaeology Essay

- For over one hundred and fifty years inquiries and research projects, some more beneficial than others, have been made into the preserved remains of lake dwellings found across Europe. The unique discoveries of pile dwellings in Lake Zurich in 1854 ignited the frantic search for more prehistoric sites, attracting interest from antiquarians seeking to better our understanding of the past (Menotti, 2004). Hundreds of new sites were found and the works of early archaeologists like Munro and Keller provided a written record for the future....   [tags: Archeology ]

Better Essays
2180 words (6.2 pages)

The Forbidden Experiment by Roger Shattuck Essay

- The Forbidden Experiment by Roger Shattuck It is one of the oldest unanswered questions in all of science. Though slightly more grounded in empirical science than the likes of "Where did we come from?" or "Why are we here?" the impossible Nature/Nurture dichotomy has tormented truth-bound scientists for years. Recent advances in genetics have brought forward new possibilities for those who would study the pure effects of environmental variables on animals, but we are far from allowing ourselves to manipulate other human beings in such ways for the sake of collecting data....   [tags: Forbidden Experiment Roger Shattuck Essays]

Better Essays
1421 words (4.1 pages)