Essay about The Food Rules : An Eater 's Manual, And Mary Maxfield

Essay about The Food Rules : An Eater 's Manual, And Mary Maxfield

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Sabotage:
Is the Food Industry Trying to Make Us Fat?
Waist sizes are expanding, everyone is on a diet of some sort, and a large majority of the population is under the care of a physician for some disease that can be attributed to the modern diet. With no end in sight to the obesity crisis and its associated diseases, individuals will need to educate themselves on healthy nutrition and how to avoid the pitfalls inherent in our food environment. Information on the origins of this epidemic, potential cures both magical and old-fashioned, and who or what is to blame for this crisis are everywhere you look. Two authors that offer their opinions on this vast subject are Michael Pollan, author of the book Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, and Mary Maxfield, graduate student in American Studies with degrees in creative social change and sociology. Pollan offers in his essay, “Escape from the Western Diet”, that the problem with today’s society is the confusion over what we should be eating to optimize our health. Pollan feels this confusion is caused by the Food Industry and healthcare experts that want to keep the population in the dark so they can peddle the newest diet trend that will increase their bottom lines. Maxfield disagrees with Pollan’s point of view and proposes in her essay, “Food as Thought: Resisting the Moralization of Eating”, that food, eating, and health have taken on a moral quality that disregards the science of nutrition in favor of judgement valves based on our weight and what diet trend we are following.
I have struggled most of my life with my weight and have found it difficult to find the correct answer to my weight problem, I am very familiar with the barrage of “diet experts” that offer the quick fix progra...


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...ot eat everything in front of you instead of restricting what the restaurants offer. However, this is easier said than done, it is incredibly wasteful to leave so much food uneaten and taking home the excess can be embarrassing or not allowed by many establishments.
In today’s world of billion-dollar food corporations with scientifically engineered ad campaigns and enormous portion sizes at every turn it is no wonder consumers are struggling to find a correct diet that is also healthy. This will continue until consumers educate themselves and take action to improve their health in the correct ways with proper nutrition and exercise programs. Legislators will have to push for truth in advertising and regulation of large food corporations and individuals will have to be responsible for what they put on their plates and whom they believe when it comes to their health.

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