Essay on Floods in Winnipeg, Canada

Essay on Floods in Winnipeg, Canada

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Introduction:
Canada is a great place to live. Winnipeg… is good enough. Winnipeg is known for its diverse population, festive multiculturalism, beautiful architecture, vast prairie land and The Jets. One thing Winnipeg is definitely not known for, being a geological hazards hot spot. These hazards are geological events that take place, which have an impact on civilization. Canada is impacted by a wide scope of events ranging from earthquakes to fires. However, Winnipeg is lucky to be conveniently located away from any seismic activity, any threat of coastal dangers, any mountain risks and lastly it is absent of even the slightest volcano. Therefore, what Winnipeg lacks in attraction it makes up for in safety. In spite of its perceived security this major Canadian city is unfortunately prone to some very serious dangers. It is home to very cold, lengthy winters, dreadful storms that lead to wet springs. Scientifically speaking “geohazards are any geological or hydrological process that poses a threat to people and/or their property” (Bilderback, 2013). Thus, the geological hazards that will be discussed in this paper are flooding, landslides, and severe weather including tornadoes and storms.
Winnipeg follows settlement trends, and happens to be amidst two very large-scale rivers. Having been quite convenient for transportation and trading purposes, it seemed like a great location for a city. Fast-forward to the year 1950, the people canoeing to work on top of water reaching 4.5 meters deep in lower areas of the city (Passfield, 2001), resentful feelings began to arise.
Ultimately leading to the proposals and implementation of the Red River Floodway. Floods the biggest geological challenge that Winnipeg faces and ...


... middle of paper ...


...50. Retrieved March 31, 2014, from http://www.manitobaphotos.com/1950.htm

Moore, J. R., Bell, A. V., Jones, A. D., 2005. Forecasting for flood warning. C.R Geoscience 337, 203-217.
Passfield, R.W., 2001. Diff’s Ditch: The Orgins, Construction, and Impact of the Red River Floodway. Manitoba History 42, p2.

Rannie, W. F., 1998. The Red River flood in Manitoba, Canada. Prairie Perspectives: Geofraphical Essays, 1-24.
Simonovic, S., Carson, R., W., 2003. Flooding in the Red River Basin – Lessons from Post Flood Activities. Natural Hazards 28(1), 345-365.
Simonovic, S., Morris, M.,O. 1997. Assessment of Social Impact of Flooding for Use in Flood Management in the Red River Basin. International Joint Commission Red River Basin Task Force, 1-45.
Service Canada. 2013. Severe Storms. Get Prepared. Government of Canada. www.getprepared.gc.ca/cnt/hzd/svrstrms-eng.aspx


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