Essay about The First Amendment of the United States Constitution

Essay about The First Amendment of the United States Constitution

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The United States Constitution was signed on September 17th, 1787. It did not include a bill of rights and it did not include their freedoms. And so, on September 25, 1789 Congress passed the first ten amendments, which were later ratified on December 15, 1791. The Bill of Rights was created by the Founding Fathers with the intent of restricting the powers of the new national government. The Bill of Rights, however, consists of 10 amendments. The first of the amendments was written because the people at America’s establishment wanted their basic freedoms guaranteed. Thus, the first freedoms guaranteed to citizens were written by James Madison and are now known as the First Amendment. “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.”
The First Amendment of the United States Constitution protects and guarantees the freedoms of citizens. That being said, the court cases dealing with the 1st amendment involve a violation of either a freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly and or petition. And so, cases regarding religion deal with prayer in public schools, limiting the right to deny medical care for religious purposes, there being an official government church and the ability for citizens to worship as they please. Cases on the topic of free speech deal with symbolic speech, such as flag burning, and pure speech-verbal speech expressed before a voluntary audience. Many of the same things that deal with the freedom of speech also deal with the freedom of press. However, the freedom of press also deals with pr...


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"First Amendment." LII / Legal Information Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2014. .

"GITLOW v. NEW YORK." Gitlow v. New York. N.p., n.d. Web. Mar. 2014. .

Lewis, Anthony. Make No Law: The Sullivan Case and the First Amendment. New York: Random House, 1991. Print.

McBride, Alex. "Schenck v US (1919)." PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 27 Mar. 2014. .

Urofsky, Melvin I. "New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (law Case)." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d. Web. Mar. 2014. .

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Essay about The First Amendment of the United States Constitution

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