The Fight For Land And Its Ensueing Struggle Essay

The Fight For Land And Its Ensueing Struggle Essay

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Throughout history, the fight for land and its ensueing struggle, has long been a precurresor for conflict. An "unclaimed" terrrority can quickly turn allies into enemies overnight. Such is the case, with both the countries of Argentina and Chile. In the early 1800s, Argentina and Chile fought side by side for independence against Spain. However, ever since then, conflict has been steadily brewing ("Winds of War" Patagonia, 2015). The main contributing reason for the conflict between them, is due to contiguity. Both countries claimed the land of Patagonia, which, caused the tension to rise, and thus a conflict ensued. . If two countries share a land or sea border, then they are thirty five times more likely to go to war. So it should come as no shocker at all, that Chile and Argentina, do indeed, share the third largest border in the world. This results in contiguity directly effecting the relationship between said countries.
However, contiguity is not the sole reason Argentina and Chile have not seen eye to eye. The major differences in economic policies are another key reason. Chile is a member of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and has a small economy based upon exports ("Chile and APEC: Selling points" The Economist, 2004). Argentina, on the other hand, is a member of Mercosur, the leading trading market in South America. Chile is associated with Mercosur, while Argentina is one of their global economic giants ("BBC News - Profile: Mercosur - Common Market of the South," 2012). The relationship between Chile and Argentina, has been directly effected, due to these differences.
When it comes to politics, both Chile and Argentina are rather similar. As a result, any conflict ensueing due to politic...


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...tivism theory, the way to achieve longstanding piece is a gradual change in social norms. The social norms for the Islamic State are set in stone by Islamic Law. So, a gradual change from these practices seems infeasible. The United States on the other hand, has experienced many changes in social norms during its existance. Although, a change as drastic as one required to coming to agree with ISIS 's principles are virtually nonexistant.
Marxism is the theory that best describes this current conflict between ISIS and the United States. We are the capitalists facing the developing state of ISIS. The differences are far too great to ever come to a peaceful agreement. We will always view terrorism as savage and they view us as materialistic people who all should be condemned. There is absolutely no meeting in the middle with these states due to each group 's ideals.

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