Fight Club Is The Film Adaptation Of The Novel Written By Chuck Palahniuk

Fight Club Is The Film Adaptation Of The Novel Written By Chuck Palahniuk

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Fight Club is the film adaptation of the novel written by Chuck Palahniuk. This film portrays the life of a thirty year old insomniac, office worker and the alter ego he creates to escape the struggles of everyday life. Themes of isolation, masculinity and consumer culture are all present throughout the film, making the main character a very relatable figure for those emerged in the “average joe” life.
The first theme uncovered in the movie is isolation, this theme is present throughout the entire movie. The viewer is introduced to the main character and narrator of the movie, whose name we are never told. By not providing his name this gives us the idea that he represents the average working class male. He never speaks of any family members, friends, or even hobbies, we are also told that he lives alone. The movie starts off with the main character at a doctors visit for insomnia, after being denied medication the Dr. suggest the main character visits a support group for men with testicular cancer so that he could see what “people who are in pain really look like”. After visiting one support group he becomes addicted to them, these support groups become his only way to share his feelings with other people, we see him get mad and even cry. These support groups become a place to gain the lack of human connection he had until the other main character Marla Singer is introduce. Marla Singer is essentially the poor female version of the narrater. When Marla is introduced so are the themes of masculinity and consumption, the entire tone of the movie changes for the few seconds when she is introduced, the lighting, music and camera angles portray in a dark and evil manner. The narrater haters Marla immediately and even refers to her ...


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...as gone too far with Fight Club and Project Mayhem. The narrator attempts to turn himself into the police only to find out that the police are apart of Project Mayhem. The narrator is able to reach on the buildings and dissemble the bomb that was supposed to kill him, but he is too late to save the other buildings. Sadly the final scene involves Marla and the narrator looking out the window of an office building watching the other buildings explode.
The themes of isolation, masculinity and consumer culture resonates through out the entire film. Unfortunately and unlike many other films it does not seem as though any of the characters in the film were truly able to resolve any large problems they were facing. Instead of facing these problems head on, the narrator chooses to live his life as someone he is not and almost ends his life in an attempt to escape reality.

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