The Federalist Papers By James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, And John Jay

The Federalist Papers By James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, And John Jay

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The Federalist papers were written by James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay. The purpose of these papers was to persuade American’s to disregard the Articles of Confederation and to replace it with the Constitution. In Federalist papers 10, 51, and 78 are crucial ideas discussed such as liberty, factions, separation of powers, and the electoral system and pluralism.

According to the Oxford dictionary, the definition of liberty is, “the state of being free within society from oppressive restrictions imposed by authority on one 's way of life, behavior, or political views.” After just being under the tyranny of England, the American people sought a weak central government, such as under the articles of confederation, however people like Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison were trying to help push the idea of a new form of government under the constitution in which there is a stronger central government. The understanding of liberty is one in which a central government is important to protect individuals, especially to protect the rights of minorities (Bronner).

According to Madison, "Liberty is to faction what air is to fire, an aliment without which it instantly expires" (Madison, Federalist 10). He believed that in order to have liberty, factions are inevitable and only natural since people divide into groups of like minded peers. Madison suggests that there are two ways to get rid of factions, but neither are truly successful. The former is to remove the causes of factions, and the latter is to control the effects of factions. The former does not work because by removing factions, one also removes liberty since the two go hand in hand. The latter would not be successful either, since it su...


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...ty that ensures peoples’ rights. Specifically, to protect its citizens who are in the minority which are the wealthy landowners. And, to have a federal government that is divided into three distinct branches to ensure that all the powers of the central government are able to check one another to safeguard any one branch of government from going out of control and taking away people’s liberties. This system of government is a form of democracy in that people get to vote and have elected officials make decisions for them. It is a form of government in which it is slow due to all the factions, however this system does more to protect the rights of the minority since in a regular democracy the majority rule, however in this case, factions truly rule and in this sense, it protects the few as well as ensuring that the majorities voice is heard (Madison, Federalist 10).

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